The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: January 1 - May 31, 1864 - Vol. 10

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

him. He will certainly move tomorrow. bear this in mind in the influence it will have on the enemy. watch him closely and if you can take any advantage of his movements do it. I do not think Longstreet should be allowed to quietly withdraw from Knoxville nor to come up and invest the place without opposition. Cause him all the annoyance you can either by demonstration or actual attack

U. S. GRANT
Maj. Genl.

Telegram received, DLC-John M. Schofield; copies (dated Feb. 20, 1864), DLC‐ USG, V, 34, 35; DNA, RG 393, Military Div. of the Miss., Letters Sent. O. R., I, xxxii, part 2, 434. On Feb. 21, Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield telegraphed to USG. "I am watching Longstreet carefully and will avail myself of

every opportunity to strike him. My cavalry is far inferior to that of the enemy; and I have no portable bridge—Hence my movements have been very much restricted during the high water—I intended to attack the enemy on Flat Creek but he retreated after my reconnoisance of yesterday. I will have a bridge in a few days. Longstreet cannot intend to invest this place without he receive reinforcements. I think his movements clearly indicate that he expects reinforcements enough to enable him to do so. Genl. Thomas' movement may effect Longstreets. I will watch him closely, and do all I can, but it is impossible to do much under present circumstances. Indeed I have thought, as suggested in your dispatch of the 12th inst. that it was most important to prepare for future operations" Copy, DLC‐ John M. Schofield. O. R., I, lii, part 1, 522-23. According to Schofield's register of letters received, USG wrote or telegraphed on Feb. 21: "What is latest information from Longstreet." DLC-John M. Schofield.


To Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas

Nashville February 20th 1864

MAJOR GENERAL GEO H THOMAS
CHATTANOOGA

Can you spare a pontoon bridge from Chattanooga to throw across the river at Decatur? If not, what objections to sending your reserve bridge train to Decatur. If required at Chattanooga afterwards, they can be towed up by our steamers or transports by rail as conveniently as from here. Answer

U. S GRANT
Major General

-147-

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