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The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: January 1 - May 31, 1864 - Vol. 10

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

Telegram, copies, DLC-USG, V, 34, 35; DNA, RG 393, Military Div. of the Miss., Letters Sent; ibid., Dept. of the Cumberland, Telegrams Received. O. R., I, xxxii, part 2, 434. On Feb. 20, 1864, Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas telegraphed to USG. "I have no bridge here that I can spare at this time The one you allude to can be spared for a short time Please order it sent here as soon as it can be dispensed with" Telegram received, DNA, RG 393, Dept. of the Tenn., Telegrams Received; copies, ibid., Military Div. of the Miss., Telegrams Received ; ibid., Dept. of the Cumberland, Telegrams Sent. O. R., I, xxxii, part 2, 434.

On Feb. 21, 11:00 A. M., USG telegraphed to Thomas. "Do your troops move to morrow? It is important that at least a demonstration be made at once." Copies, DLC-USG, V, 34, 35; DNA, RG 393, Military Div. of the Miss., Letters Sent; ibid., Dept. of the Cumberland, Telegrams Received. O. R., I, xxxii, part 2, 442. On the same day, 4:00 P. M., Thomas telegraphed to USG. "Your dispatch of this morning received. The troops will move tomorrow morning by daylight. Have sent you a copy of my instructions to Genl. Palmer by courier this noon." Copy, DNA, RG 393, Dept. of the Cumberland, Telegrams Sent. O. R., I, xxxii, part 2, 443.

On Feb. 22, 11:30 P. M., Thomas telegraphed to USG. "The following has been recd. from General Palmer at Ringgold 10 30 P. M. We have reliable information that Cheatham & Clebournes Div. have gone to Demopolis Clebourne left yesterday Genl Cruft is at Red Clay tonight & has pushed a reconnoissance towards Varnell station Long has gone towards Dalton on the Spring place road with orders to push his reconnoissance as far as possible" Telegram received, DNA, RG 393, Dept. of the Tenn., Telegrams Received; copy, ibid., Military Div. of the Miss., Telegrams Received. O. R., I, xxxii, part 2, 444.


To Jesse Root Grant

Nashville Ten.
Feb.y 20th 1864

DEAR FATHER,

I have rec'd your letter and those accompanying; towit. Mr. Newton's 1 and I. N. Morris.' I may write to Mr. Newton but it will be differently from what he expects. I am not a candidate for any office. All I want is to be left alone to fight this war out, fight all rebel rebel oposition, and restore a happy Union, in the shortest possible time. You know, or ought to know, that the publick prints are not the proper mediums through which to let a personal feeling pass. I know that I feel that nothing personal to myself could ever induce me to accept a political office.

From your letter you seem to have taken an active feeling, to

-148-

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