The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: January 1 - May 31, 1864 - Vol. 10

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

To Maj. Gen. Franz Sigel

Cypher

Apl. 12th 1864 [1:30 P. M. ]

MAJ. GEN. SIGEL, CUMBERLAND VA.

Your letter received. Will not a week or ten days good weather make the programe laid out in my previous instructions practicable. The route you now suggest, that is by sending the whole force to Gauly Bridge 1 to start was my idea exactly simply consulting the map without any personal knowledge of the country to be traversed. Consultation however with officers who had been in the country induced me to give the instructions I did. The late rains has so far set back offensive operations that we can change plan if found necessary any time in the next ten days.

U. S. GRANT
Lt. Gen

ALS (telegram sent), DNA, RG 107, Telegrams Collected (Bound); telegram received, ibid. O. R., I, xxxiii, 845. On April 11, 1864, Maj. Gen. Franz Sigel telegraphed at length to USG about problems presented by impassable roads near Beverly. Telegram received (dated April 12), DNA, RG 107, Telegrams Collected (Bound); copy, Sigel Papers, OClWHi. Dated April 12 in O. R., I, xxxiii, 844-45. On the same day, 7:00 P. M., Sigel telegraphed to USG. "Your despatch of today is received I will continue in making all dispositions necessary to carry out your programme. According to it there would be only three 3 regiments of Infantry left besides the rest of Averills Cavalry to defend or move up the Shenandoah Valley. Ten 10 would go with Genl Ord. Six 6 with Genl Crook besides the thirty sixth Ohio and four 4 would be posted on the line of Balto & Ohio Rl. Rd. from Monocacy to Parkersburg amongst them two Maryland and one Virginia regiment raised for local defense and necessary to guard our stores and depots and to load and unload trains" Telegram received, DNA, RG 107, Telegrams Collected (Bound); copy, Sigel Papers, OClWHi. O. R., I, xxxiii, 845-46. See following telegram.

1.
Gauley Bridge, West Va., at the confluence of the Gauley and Kanawha rivers, approximately twenty-five miles southeast of Charleston.

-282-

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