The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: January 1 - May 31, 1864 - Vol. 10

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview
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wooden gun-boat that can be sent from here of suitable draught to enter the sound." Ibid., pp. 938-39.
2.
Washington, N. C., on the Pamlico River near the mouth of the Tar River, approximately twenty-five miles north of New Berne. On April 22, noon, USG telegraphed to Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler. "Your despatch received. You must not movements of the enemy interrupt carrying out your programme in the coming campaign. It would be better to evacuate Washington and Plymouth than to have your whole force neutralized defending them" Telegram received, DLC-Benjamin F. Butler; DNA, RG 107, Telegrams Collected (Bound); ibid., Telegrams Collected (Unbound); copies, ibid., RG 108, Letters Sent; DLC-USG, V, 45, 59. O. R., I, xxxiii, 946. On April 21, 8:30 P. M., Butler telegraphed to Halleck, and a copy went to USG. Ibid., pp. 278-79. See letter to Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler, April 19, 1864.

To Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck

Culpepper Va
April 22nd 1864 12 m

MAJ GEN H. W. HALLECK
CHIEF OF STAFF.

You can see from Genl Brayman's despatch to me something of Gen'l Banks disaster 1 I have been satisfied for the last nine months that to keep General Banks in command was to neutralize a large force and to support it most expensively. Although I do not insist on it I think the best interests of service demand that Genl Reynolds 2 should be placed in command at once and that he name his own successor to the command of New Orleans.

U. S. GRANT
Lt Genl

Telegram received, DNA, RG 107, Telegrams Collected (Bound); copies, ibid., RG 108, Letters Sent; DLC-USG, V, 45, 59. O. R., I, xxxiv, part 3, 252-53. On April 23, 1864, Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck endorsed this telegram. "This telegram shown to the President, by order of the Secretary of War. The President replied that he must delay acting on it for the present." Ibid., p. 253. On April 26, 2:15 P. M., Halleck telegraphed to USG. "Your telegram of the 22nd asking for the removal of Genl Banks was submitted to the President who replied that he must await further information before he could act in the matter. Genl. Steele was at Camden on the 20th and was informed of Genl Banks disaster. An order to him to return to Little Rock would probably reach him in five or six days. One to Genl Banks would not reach him in less than two or three weeks. This would

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The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: January 1 - May 31, 1864 - Vol. 10
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