The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: January 1 - May 31, 1864 - Vol. 10

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

small party of cavalry I have in front of Ricketts Ricketts having received my order after yours is awaiting your action on this suggestion" "Warren informs me that Wadsworth & Robinson got into action just in time to meet Wilcox's Division (Hills corps) and drove them handsomely for a mile I have also just heard from Sedgewicke who reports Wrights right having been vigorously attacked at 8. P. M. the attack handsomely repulsed—" "After conversing with my corps commanders, I am led to believe that it will be difficult owing to the dense thicket in which their commands are located the fatigued condition of the men rendering it difficult to rouse them early enough & the necessity of some day light to properly put in re-inforcements All these considerations induce me to suggest the attack should not be made till Six 6 o'clock instead of ½ past Four —I have ordered it for 4.30, but am of the opinion it will be more likely to be simultaneous if made at 6. Should you permit this change I will advise corps commanders. It appears to be the general opinion among prisoners that Longstreet was not in the action to-day, though expected, and that his position was to be on their right or our left. His force supposed to be about 12,000. He probably will attack Hancock to-morrow. I have notified Hancock to look out for his left, but think it will be well to have Willcox up as soon as possible." ALS, DNA, RG 108, Letters Received. O. R., I, xxxvi, part 2, 404-5. The last is incomplete in RG 108. On the same day, Lt. Col. William R. Rowley wrote to Meade. "I am directed by the General Commanding to say that you may change the hour of attack to 5 o'clock, as he is afraid if delayed until 6, the enemy would take the initiative which he desires specially to avoid—Gen Burnside is directed to bring up Gen Wilcox's division with his other troops if they can possibly be spared, and will probably bring them—" Copies, DLC-USG, V, 45, 59, 66; DNA, RG 108, Letters Sent. O. R., I, xxxvi, part 2, 405.

1.
James B. Ricketts of N. Y., USMA 1839, served in the Mexican War with the 1st Art. Promoted to capt. as of Aug. 3, 1852, he was severely wounded and captured during the first battle of Bull Run. Appointed brig. gen. as of July 21, 1861, he was again wounded at the battle of Antietam, and his disability led to assignment to the court-martial of Maj. Gen. Fitz John Porter. In May, 1864, he commanded the 3rd Div., 6th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac.

To Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck

Headqrs Armies &c
Wilderness Town May 6th 11.30 A. M.

MAJ GEN HALLECK WASHINGTON

We have engaged with the enemy in full force since early yesterday. So far there is no decisive result, but I think all things are progressing favorably. Our loss to this time I do not think exceeds eight thousand of whom a large proportion, are slightly wounded. Brig Gen. Hays 1 was killed yesterday, and Gens Getty 2 and Bart

-400-

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