The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: January 1 - May 31, 1864 - Vol. 10

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

ALS (telegram sent), Lackawanna Historical Society, Scranton, Pa.; telegram received, DNA, RG 107, Telegrams Collected (Bound). O. R., I, xxxvi, part 1, 5; ibid., I, xxxvi, part 2, 781. This telegram reached Washington on May 15, 1864, 10:00 P. M. On the same day, 1:30 P. M, and 8:30 P. M., Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck telegraphed to USG. "Telegram from Genl Sherman dated 8 P. M. yesterday. Had hard fighting all day near Resaca but drove the enemy. His forces are all united and he will attack at all points to-day. Six thousand splendid Infantry embark to-day for Belle Plain with orders to push forward to your Head Qurs. Each man carries on his person five days rations and one hundred & fifty rounds of [c]artriges." "Genl Butler says that Genl Kautz was sent on the 12th with orders to cut the Danville R. R. and also the James River Canal. Genl Augur estimates that the reinforcements which will be at Belle Plain by to-morrow night for Army of Potomac will be at least twenty four thousand I hope in a few days to increase the number to thirty thousand." ALS (telegrams sent), DNA, RG 107, Telegrams Collected (Bound); telegrams received, ibid.; ibid., RG 108, Letters Received. O. R., I, xxxvi, part 2, 781-82. See letter to Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside, May 16, 1864.

1.
James St. C. Morton of Pa., USMA 1851, appointed brig. gen. as of Nov. 29, 1862. On Nov. 3, 1863, 5:00 P. M., Asst. Secretary of War Charles A. Dana, Chattanooga, had telegraphed to Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton. "Bridge here still unfinished and little progress with it. Genl. Morton who has charge of this important work, grossly neglects his duty—" Telegram received, DLC-Edwin M. Stanton. On Nov. 4, 11:00 A. M., USG telegraphed to Halleck. "I would respectfully ask that Br. Gen. St. C. Morton be assigned to duty else- where Whilst a fine Engineer, he is reported by Gen Thomas as unsuited for the kind of work we have in the field, or to command troops. He might do well on the Pacific where more time can be allowed." Telegram received, DNA, RG 107, Telegrams Collected (Bound); ibid., RG 94, Letters Received; copies, ibid., RG 107, Telegrams Received in Cipher; ibid., RG 393, Military Div. of the Miss., Hd. Qrs. Correspondence; DLC-USG, V, 40, 94. On Nov. 5, Halleck wrote to Stanton. "I respectfully recommend that Capt Morton be mustered out as a Brig Genl of Vols, & ordered to report to the Chf Engr. for duty on fortifications." AES, DNA, RG 94, Letters Received. Morton was mustered out as brig. gen. of vols. as of Nov. 7, retaining his regular rank of capt. Assigned in May, 1864, as USG requested, Morton was killed on June 17 in the assault on Petersburg.

To Maj. Gen. George G. Meade

[May 15, 1864]

Would it not be well for Gen. Birney 1 to drive the enemy from the Brown house refered to in this dispatch and hold the place until somithing is decided upon? My opinion now is that our next attack should be from Wrights position he supported by

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