The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: January 1 - May 31, 1864 - Vol. 10

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

On May 31, Breneman wrote to Rawlins. "I have the honor to report that, protected by an armed force of cavalry and infantry (in obedience to instructions from headquarters Armies of the United States to Brigadier-General Abercrombie), under command of Colonel Di Cesnola, Fourth New York Cavalry, I proceeded to Jones' field, in the Wilderness, on the 27th instant; recovered all the wounded at that point, 86 in number, mostly from the Second Corps; brought them safely to Fredericksburg, Va.; had them placed on board of a transport the same night, and they are probably by this time in general hospital, Washington. From a few prisoners captured belonging to the Ambulance Corps of the so-called Confederate Army, it was learned that the enemy were removing the wounded, our own and theirs, from their hospitals at Parker's Store and Robertson's Tavern, to Gordonsville and Richmond. I hope that in the performance of these duties I have met the approbation of the lieutenant-general commanding the Armies of the United States," Ibid., p. 415.


To Maj. Gen. George G. Meade

Headqrs Armies of the United States—
Near Spottsylvania Va. May 18th/64

MAJ GEN MEADE
COMD'G A. P.
GENERAL

Before daylight tomorrow morning I propose to draw Hancock & Burnside from the positions they now hold and put Burnside to the left of Wright. Wright and Burnside should then force their way up as close to the enemy as they can get, without a general engagement, or with a general engagement if the enemy will come out of their works to fight, and entrench. Hancock should march and take up a position as if in support of the two left Corps. Tomorrow night at twelve or one o'clock, he will be moved Southeast with all his force, and as much Cavalry as can be given to him, to get as far towards Richmond on the line of the Fredericksburg rail road, as he can make, fighting the enemy in whatever force he may find him. If the enemy make a general move to meet this, they will be followed by the other three Corps of the Army and attacked if possible, before time is given to entrench—

Suitable directions will at once be given for all trains and surplus Artillery to conform to this movement.

U. S. GRANT Lt Gen—

-464-

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