The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: January 1 - May 31, 1864 - Vol. 10

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

On May 31, Meade wrote to USG that C. S. A. forces were entrenched on the road from Bethesda Church to Cold Harbor. Thomas F. Madigan, Inc., Autograph Letters, Manuscripts and Historical Documents (New York, 1937), p. 38.


To Maj. Gen. William F. Smith

Near Haws Shop, Va. May 30th/64 7,30 p m

MAJ. GEN. W. S. SMITH,
COMD. G 18TH A. C.
GENERAL,

Triplicate orders have been sent to you to march up the South bank of the Pamunky to New Castle there to await further orders. I send with this a Brigade of Cavalry to accompany you on the march. As yet no further directions can be given you than is contained in your orders. The movements of the enemy this evening on our left, down the Mechanicsville road, would indicate the possibility of a design on

his part to get between you and the Army of the Potomac. They will be so closely watched that nothing would suit me better than such a move. Sheridan is on our left flank with two Divisions of Cavalry with directions to watch as far out as he can go on the Mechanicsville and Cold Harbor roads. This, with the care you can give your left flank with the Cavalry you have and the Brigade sent to you, and a knowledge of the fact that any movement of the enemy towards you cannot fail to be noticed and followed up from here, will make your advance secure.

The position of the A. P. this evening is as follows; The left of the 5th Corps is on the

Shady Grove road extending to the Mechanicsville road and about three miles south of the Tolopotomoy. The 9th Corps is to the right of the 5th then comes the 2d & 6th forming a line being on the road from Hanover C. H. to Cold Harbor and about six miles south of the C. H.

U. S. GRANT
Lt. Gen

-498-

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