The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: July 7 - December 31, 1863 - Vol. 9

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

burne. "Many thanks for your letter & especially for the enclosure. I am very glad to have a copy of that speech. My impressions concerning Grant do not differ from yours. I tell every body that he is the most modest, the most disinterested, and the most honest man I have ever known. Since my return I have met hundreds of prominent and influential men to whom I have said that, and other things in the same direction. To the question they all ask: 'Doesn't he drink?'—I have been able, from my own knowledge to give a decided negative. —When do you expect to be here? What are the prospects in Illinois? And how will the elections generally go in the North West?" ALS, DLC-Elihu B. Washburne.

1.
On July 25, U. S. Senator Henry Wilson of Mass. wrote to Washburne. "I con[g]ratulate you on the brilliant success of your friend Gen. Grant. When others censured, denounced or defamed him you stood by him, and he has nobly justified your confidence. I honor you for your fidelity to a man you knew and in whom you had the fulliest confidence. In this hour when the nation acknowl- edges his great services it must be a source of gratification to you to feel that in the day of trial you stood by your friend. A day or two ago I had a long talk with Dana late of the Tribune who has spent four months with Grant. Dana you know is a man of talent and a good judge of men. He speaks in the most glow- ing terms of Grant. You would be gratified to hear him talk. He tells me that Grant is modest, true, firm, honest and full of capacity for war. He says that he is in favor of destroying the cause of this civil war—of overthrowing Slavery and that his army is deeply imbued with the same feeling. I am glad to hear from so good a judge such an account of Grant and his noble army. It is reported that Grant has been invited to take command of the army of the Potomac. I do not believe it, but if it should be made to him I hope he will not for a moment think of it. He has a splendid and a united army. He can render great service to the country with that army. I fear if he should take the Potomac army that he would be ruined by a set of men in and out of that army. I am confident his great success has excited envy, and that if an oppotunity should offer he would be sacri- ficed...." ALS, ibid.

To Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck

Head Quarters, Dept. of the Ten.
Vicksburg Miss. Aug. 31st 1863.

MAJ. GEN. H. W. HALLECK
GEN. IN CHIEF OF THE ARMY,
GEN.

I shall start this evening on a short trip to New Orleans, remaining there but a day or two. Gen. Banks is not yet off and I am desirous of seeing him before he starts to learn his plans and see

-219-

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