The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: July 7 - December 31, 1863 - Vol. 9

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview
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fell flat on his side but luckily did not hurt the General at all, he stood the journey very well and does not seem at all the worse or even fatigued. We have not as yet gone into quarters and it will take several days for our baggage to get over the mountain. The General is staying with Maj. Gen Thomas, and his staff are scattered about among the other officers here. I am staying with Major Gen Reynolds This is a rough and wretched looking place as can well be imagined. I hope that you and your little pet Jess are well and agreeably situated I will endeavour to keep you posted in regard to the General's health he is in fine spirits." ALS, USG 3.

1.
At this point, twenty-one lines have been heavily cancelled, the first nine so heavily that it is only possible to determine that USG states that Col. Clark B. Lagow was lost and that cav. had been sent to search for him. The final lines read: "But when I left at twelve o'clock in the morning [———] got out to look for him. I presume he will find it necessary to go back to Louisville to look for his horses. If he does go back before rejoining he will never return. I [presume] before you get this you will have seen Lagow." ALS, DLC-USG. See letter to Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, Nov. 29, 1863.

To Henry T. Blow

Chattanooga, Tenn, October 25, 1863.

HON. HENRY T. BLOW, MEMBER OF CONGRESS:

DEAR SIR: Your letter of the 21st inst., asking for copy of document referred to by Gen. Blair, charging you with joining in an effort for my removal from command, is just received. I did not save that, nor do I save any document not having direct reference to my duties. If, however, Franklin A. Dick has preserved copies of all his letters, written to the Attorney General, Mr. Bates, during the summer of '62, he can furnish you with the document I presume General Blair referred to. At all events, I know of no other.

With great respect,
Your obedient servant,
U. S. GRANT,
Major General, U. S. A.

Missouri Democrat, Nov. 14, 1863. For the letter of Sept. 28, 1862, from Franklin A. Dick, a prominent St. Louis lawyer, to Attorney General Edward Bates, see telegram to Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck, Sept. 25, 1862. Henry T.

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The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: July 7 - December 31, 1863 - Vol. 9
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