The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant: July 7 - December 31, 1863 - Vol. 9

By John Y. Simon; Ulysses S. Grant | Go to book overview

part 2, 46-47. Earlier on Nov. 27, 1863, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman had sent Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard's 11th Army Corps to cut the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad between Dalton, Ga., and Cleveland, Tenn. See telegram to Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck, Nov. 27, 1863, 1:00 A. M., note 2. This operation helped to turn the C. S. A. position in the gap just east of Ringgold, Ga. O. R., I, xxxi, part 2, 577; see preceding telegram. USG and Sherman conferred at Ringgold on Nov. 27, early afternoon, and at Graysville, Ga., on Nov. 28, also early afternoon. O. R., I, xxxi, part 2, 577; William Wrenshall Smith, "Holocaust Holiday ..." Civil War Times Illustrated, XVIII, 6 (Oct., 1979), 39, 40. On Nov. 28, "10h 10m" (P. M. ), Sherman, Graysville, wrote to USG. "I have been over to to See Genls Davis & Howard and will start tomorrow for Cleveland, will be tomorrow night near a point marked Tuckers on the Coast Survey Map—Gen Howard moves by the old Alabama Road and Davis & Blair by the Ringgold & Ooltawah Road. Now I hear that the Cavalry have already destroyed a large part of the Railroad about Cleveland, and I infer from the Despatches that Col Duff has shown me that Longstreet is yet (27th) at or Near Knoxville passing rather above Knoxville & that Sam Jones is comig to him from Abington. Gnl Hooker also has sent me a copy of his Report to you that Bragg is collecting his Army at Tunnel Hill and that he has held on to Palmer. Now these may change your plans. If so send me orders via Tyners & Ooltawah. It may be imprudent to spread too much. That was Rosecrans mistake, and we should not commit it. Unless I recive orders I will go to Calhoun, and find out something definite about Longstreet and if he is coming down we must thwart him. I dont like to See Hooker alarmed, but it would be prudent to have the Road cleared of all the trains, ambulances, caissons & C that are now sticking in the mud. Hooker also has too much artillery to move with anything like expedition." ALS, DNA, RG 393, Military Div. of the Miss., Letters Received. O. R., I, xxxi, part 2, 47-48. On Nov. 29, to protect Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger's column as it proceeded toward Knoxville, Sherman concentrated his inf. at Cleveland, marching the next day to the Hiwassee River near Calhoun and Charleston, Tenn. Ibid., p. 577; ibid., I, xxxi, part 1, 433. See letter to Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, Nov. 29, 1863.


To Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas

Ringgold Ga November 27. 1. P. M.

MAJOR GENERAL GEO H THOMAS
NEAR CHATTANOOGA

Hooker has just driven the enemy from this place, capturing three pieces of Artillery and some prisoners. Sherman is near by. It is reported by citizens that Longstreet is expected to morrow and that the enemy will make a stand at Dalton. I do not intend to pursue further however. I think it best not to rely on statements of citizens altogether. You will direct Granger therefore, to start

-457-

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