Skeptical Linguistic Essays

By Paul M. Postal | Go to book overview

11
Junk Ethics 2
The Most Irresponsible Passage
Consider a contest to determine the most irresponsible passage written by a professional linguist in the entire history of linguistics. Contestants will no doubt differ in their choice of entries; here I specify and try to justify mine.The most irresponsible passage ever written by a linguist about the overall subject matter of linguistics is, I suggest, the five paragraphs (here broken up) quoted in (1). To facilitate its analysis and discussion, I have numbered the twenty successive sentences therein by associating a prefixed angle bracketed numeral with each. I have also suppressed from the quoted text the author's footnote numerals.
1. Chomsky (1999: 33–34)

“<1> A broader category of questions has to do with the 'internalist' conception of language adopted in this discussion, and in the line of inquiry from which it derives for the past 40 years, a branch of what has been called 'biolinguistics. ' <2> FL (= faculty of language: PMP) is considered to be a subcomponent of Jones's mind/brain; Jones's (I -) language L is the state of his FL, which he puts to use in various ways. <3> We study these objects more or less as we study the system of motor organization or visual perception, or the immune or digestive systems. <4> It is hard to imagine an approach to language that does not adopt such conceptions, at least tacitly. <5> So we discover, I think, even when it is strenuously denied, but I will not pursue the matter here. <6> Internalist biolinguistic inquiry does not, of course, question the legitimacy of other approaches to language, any more than internalist inquiry into bee communication in

-296-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Skeptical Linguistic Essays
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 414

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.