Conservation Medicine: Ecological Health in Practice

By A. Alonso Aguirre; Richard S. Ostfeld et al. | Go to book overview

22
The Mountain Gorilla and
Conservation Medicine
Michael Cranfield
Lynne Gaffikin
Jonathan Sleeman
Matthew Rooney

Certain species, especially those conservation biologists term “umbrella species, ” engender a broad suite of ecological values and act as an ecological proxy for habitat conservation. The mountain gorilla (Gorilla gorilla beringei) serves as an umbrella species within the montane forests of Nile– Zaire Divide of Central Africa. Unique challenges to the mountain gorilla dictate that a different and perhaps more concentrated approach to conservation must be employed than that used for the other two subspecies of gorilla. Subject to the risks associated with small population dynamics, the mountain gorilla numbers are estimated at 600–640 individuals, found in two equal-sized isolated populations in two protected park areas, the Virunga Mountains, including 375 km2 in Rwanda, Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda, and Bwindi Impenetrable Forest including 330 km2 in Uganda (Butynski and Kalina 1998). It is postulated that these two populations have been separated for approximately 1,000 years, the length of time the landscape between these forests has been converted to intensive agricultural use. Although impossible to substantiate, historical numbers of mountain gorillas before agricultural activities began have been estimated at approximately 10,000 (C. Sholley, personal commun. 1999).

Conservation threats to mountain gorillas can be summarized as follows: habitat loss (at a rate of 0.5–1.9% yearly), incidental hunting (for both subsistence and the rapidly expanding commercial bushmeat market), intrinsic susceptibility to disease and loss of genetic fitness as a result of small population size, management challenges as a result of the political bureaucratic dimensions of three separate governments and transboundary operational difficulties for nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and perhaps most insidious, the severe ecological imbalance brought about by the influence of humans on the gorilla-inhabited

-282-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Conservation Medicine: Ecological Health in Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 407

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.