Conservation Medicine: Ecological Health in Practice

By A. Alonso Aguirre; Richard S. Ostfeld et al. | Go to book overview

29
Wildlife Health and Environmental
Security

New Challenges and Opportunities
Jamie K. Reaser
Edward J. Gentz
Edward E. Clark, Jr.

29.1 Environmental Security

Environmental security is the concept that social (and thus political and economic) stability affects, and is affected by, the abundance and distribution of natural resources. Poor human health, mass human migrations, and border zone conflicts are often symptoms of environmental insecurity, when human populations perceive that they are not able to acquire natural resources at an adequate level to sustain themselves (Dabelko 1998; Kennedy 1998; U. S. Department of State 1997). When the environment is adversely stressed, the ability of natural biological processes to maintain and renew the structure and function of ecosystems, the ultimate source of natural resources, is compromised (Daily 1997; Spellerberg 1996). We face ever-increasing threats to environmental security in this millennium: the demand for natural resources will intensify as the human population tops 7.5 billion by 2015 (OECD 1997), the climate continues to warm (IPCC 1996; Gore 1992), and advanced technologies will enable resource extraction more extensively and at faster rates than at any time in history.

Mortality is a crude measure of stress. Yet, the information typically used to gauge environmental condition, and thus environmental security, derives from the assessment of trends in biodiversity, especially the decline and decimation of certain species (Halvorson and Davis 1996; Soule´ 1986; Ehrlich and Ehrlich 1981). However, by the time a decline in a population is perceived, the factors that led to the decline are often indeterminable, population recovery is costly if not impossible, and the repercussions of the decline have had a broad negative impact throughout the ecosystem (Spellerberg 1996; Soule´ 1986). Because acute and chronic stress may each contribute to detectable illness before death, the

-383-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Conservation Medicine: Ecological Health in Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 407

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.