Resistance and Rebellion: Lessons from Eastern Europe

By Roger D. Petersen | Go to book overview

2.
Mechanisms and Process
As outlined in the previous chapter, rebellions against strong regimes generally involve multiple stages. Correspondingly, rebellions necessitate multiple mechanisms that serve to drive individuals from one stage to the next as well as mechanisms that sustain action in vital roles. This chapter provides a detailed description of three sets of interconnected mechanisms crucial for initiating and sustaining rebellion:
1. Mechanisms driving movement from neutrality to widespread, but unorganized and unarmed, resistance (0 to +1).
2. Mechanisms driving movement to locally organized and armed rebellion (+1 to +2).
3. Mechanisms sustaining locally organized rebellion (maintaining action at +2).

From Neutrality to Widespread, Unarmed, and
Unorganized Resistance

Some of the actions that characterize +1 behavior include writing antiregime graffiti, singing nationalist songs on buses, handing out or accepting antiregime literature, boycotting elections, and participating in “spontaneous” demonstrations. The significance of these actions is that they are public manifestations of antiregime sentiment, and, as each involves the possibility of sanction, they serve as public indicators of the number of risk accepters in the general populace and the amount of risk they will incur.1 In Chairman

____________________
1
As stated in Chapter 1, I am challenging Timur Kuran's argument that the distribution of thresholds is basically unknowable. Individuals are capable of signaling their threshold, at least in terms of its risk component, using symbolic actions.

-32-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Resistance and Rebellion: Lessons from Eastern Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Figures and Tables xi
  • Preface xiii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Mechanisms and Process 32
  • 3 - Lithuania, 1940–1941 80
  • 4 - Rebellion in an Urban Community: the Role of Leadership and Centralization 134
  • 5 - The German Occupation of Lithuania 153
  • 6 - Postwar Lithuania 170
  • 7 - More Cases, More Comparisons 205
  • 8 - Resistance in the Perestroika Period 236
  • 9 - Fanatics and First Actors 272
  • 10 - Conclusions 296
  • Bibliography 305
  • Index 317
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 321

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.