Resistance and Rebellion: Lessons from Eastern Europe

By Roger D. Petersen | Go to book overview

8.
Resistance in the Perestroika Period

This chapter continues both the substantive and theoretical agendas of the book. Substantively, sections of this chapter and the next complete the history of Lithuanian anti-Soviet resistance (the events in Vilnius, Lithuania, in January 1991 are the subject matter of the following chapter). Theoretically, this chapter continues the process of applying the template of resistance mechanisms across new and expanded contexts. Here, the same template of mechanisms used previously is employed to investigate resistance in the perestroika period. Does this approach yield insights in a more modern time? Let us consider first what is to be explained.

Open anti-Soviet resistance resurfaced in the late perestroika period. It was not a violent rebellion involving community-based cells but rather took the form of mass rallies. This resistance was nonviolent, and loosely organized; individual participation meant moving from 0 to +1 on the spectrum. The essence of this participation was the same as in the 1940s: individuals accepting risk in resistance action against an opponent holding superior force.1 This chapter covers only a small part of the Eastern European “uprisings” of the late 1980s; the selection of cases rotates on the existence of clear risk in terms of personal safety and possible threats to jobs and careers.2

____________________
1
Participation in these rallies did indeed involve calculations of significant risk. In retrospect, it seems that Gorbachev “let Eastern Europe go, but when protests began in Czechoslovakia and East Germany in October 1989, neither the dissidents nor regimes expected that they would produce fundamental political change in a few short weeks and the repressive powers of the government still were a foremost consideration. As in the People's Republic of China, these governments had the abilities to attack demonstrators physically and to punish them afterward by denying jobs, promotions, and other goods, and they were in command of these abilities as late as the summer of 1989. As discussed later, Honecker ordered a crackdown in East Germany on October 9, 1989, only to be stopped at the last moment by his security chief. The option of imposing martial law, witnessed in 1981 in Poland, was also available.
2
Much of this chapter grows out of an article I cowrote with Rasma Karklins, “Decision Calculus of Protestors and Regimes: Eastern Europe 1989, Journal of Politics 55 (1993): 588–614. The sections on Czechoslovakia, East Germany, and deassurance borrow heavily from this article. I am indebted to Karklins for many of the points in these sections. The work on Lithuania is mine alone.

-236-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Resistance and Rebellion: Lessons from Eastern Europe
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 321

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.