The Autobiography of Alfred H. Mendes 1897-1991

By Michèle Levy; Alfred H. Mendes | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
For discussion of the small magazines published in Trinidad at this time, see Sander 1978, 1-9.
2.
Rutter uses the term "Shaker", for the better known "Shouter Baptists".
3.
In Livingston 1974.

Chapter 1: Madeira Prologue, 1846-1897
1.
Like Nora in Mendes's story "Bert and Betty Briggs - English".
2.
A fourth brother, Manoel, is mentioned in an address delivered by C. B. Franklin to St Ann's Church of Scotland on 17 September 1933: "An 87-year Reminiscence: Flight of the Portuguese from Madeira in 1846".

Chapter 2: Early Memories, 1897-1912
1.
This was Alfred Mendes's beloved "Coolgardie", owned at the time by the family of Emil Straker of the Barbadian singing group The Merry Men.
2.
Harry deSouza. See appendix A.
3.
Alfred Mendes Snr's brothers Albert and Francis (Frank) also bought houses in Victoria Square.
4.
In Caribbean folklore, a jumbie is a spirit or ghost; a soucouyant is an old hag who transforms into a ball of fire by night and sucks the blood of her victims.
5.
Mendes contradicts his earlier statement that he was eight when he met Maria.

Chapter 3: School in England, 1912-1915
1.
There is a hiatus in the manuscript at this point. A marginal note indicates that Mendes had intended a description of the town of Hitchin here.
2.
A fusion of memories? If Mendes and Audrey were about the same age and she died in her late teens, then she could not yet be dead if the literary experiments which he describes were performed in his sixteenth year.
3.
One of the "new towns" founded in 1903 by the social reformer Sir Ebenezer Howard.
4.
Mendes later refers to this man as a teacher of English. T. G. Williams identi- fies himself in a letter to Mendes in 1957 as a teacher of English and history.

-174-

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