Press, Politics and the Public Sphere in Europe and North America, 1760-1820

By Hannah Barker; Simon Burrows | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
Margaret C. Jacob, 'The Mental Landscape of the Public Sphere: a European Perspective', Eighteenth-Century Studies, 28, 1 (fall 1994), 95–113, p. 96. See also Marvin B. Becker, The Emergence of Civil Society in the Eighteenth Century: A Privileged Moment in the History of England, Scotland and France (Bloomington, IN, 1994).
2
Important sources for the socio-cultural and political development of the period under review include Janet Hartley, A Social History of the Russian Empire 1650–1825 (London, 1999); Gary Marker, Publishing, Printing and the Origins of Intellectual Life in Russia, 1700–1800 (Princeton, NJ, 1985); Nicholas Riasanovsky, A Parting of Ways: Government and the Educated Public in Russia, 1801–1855 (Oxford, 1976); David Saunders, Russia in the Age of Reaction and Reform, 1801–1881 (London, 1992); and Elise Kimerling Wirtschafter, Structures of Society: Imperial Russia's People of Various Ranks (DeKalb, IL, 1994).
3
See A. G. Mazour, The First Russian Revolution, 1825 (Stanford, CA, 1961).
4
Marc Raeff, Michael Speransky, Statesman of Imperial Russia, 1772–1839 (The Hague, 1969), p. 291; L. P. Burmistrova, Provintsial'naia gazeta v epokhu russkikh prosvetitelei: gubernskie vedomosti Povolzh'ia i Urala 1840–1850 gg. (Kazan, 1985), pp. 39, 41–2. Most provincial gazettes emerged after 1838, when governors began to follow instructions from the Ministry of the Interior to publish such titles regularly.
5
W. Bruce Lincoln, 'The Problem of Glasnost' in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Russian Politics', European Studies Review, 11 (1981), 171–88, p. 172.
6
Marc Raeff, 'Transfiguration and Modernization: the Paradoxes of Social Disciplining, Paedagogical Leadership and the Enlightenment in EighteenthCentury Russia', in Hans Erich Bödeker and Ernst Hinrichs (eds. ), Alteuropa– Ancien Regime–Frühe Neuzeit: Probleme und Methoden der Forschung (Stuttgart, 1991), 99–115, p. 109, quoted by Douglas Smith, Working the Rough Stone: Freemasonry and Society in Eighteenth-Century Russia (DeKalb, IL, 1999), p. 58.
7
A. N. Radishchev, A Journey from St Petersburg to Moscow, ed. R. P. Thaler (Cambridge, 1958), pp. 165–6.
8
Jay Jensen and Richard Bayley, 'Highlights of the Development of Russian Journalism, 1553–1917', Journalism Quarterly, 41 (summer 1964), 403–15, 436, p. 403.
9
Radishchev, A Journey from St Petersburg to Moscow, pp. 164–5, 171.
10
Sidney Monas, The Third Section: Police and Society in Russia under Nicholas I (Cambridge, 1961), pp. 135–6. Besides its impracticality, the ban exposed the authorities to ridicule because it included printed music.
11
See especially Charles A. Ruud, Fighting Words; Imperial Censorship and the Russian Press, 1804–1906 (Toronto, 1982).
12
Monas, The Third Section, p. 136; V. G. Berezina, Russkaia zhurnalistika pervoi chetverti XIX veka (Leningrad, 1965), p. 54.
13
A primary source for this development is 'Unichtozheniia masonskikh lozh v Rossii 1822 g. ', Russkaia starina, 18 (March 1877), 455–79;(April 1877), 641–64.
14
Saunders, Russia in the Age of Reaction and Reform, p. 155.
15
Lincoln, 'The Problem of Glasnost”, p. 173.

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Press, Politics and the Public Sphere in Europe and North America, 1760-1820
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Notes on the Contributors vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes *
  • 1 - The Cosmopolitan Press, 1759–1815 23
  • Notes *
  • 2 - The Netherlands, 1750–1813 48
  • Notes *
  • 3 - Germany, 1760–1815 69
  • Notes *
  • 4 - England, 1760–1815 93
  • Notes *
  • 5 - Ireland, 1760–1820s 113
  • Notes *
  • 6 - America, 1750–1820 140
  • Notes *
  • 7 - France, 1750–89 159
  • Notes *
  • 8 - The French Revolutionary Press 182
  • Notes *
  • 9 - Italy, 1760–1815 201
  • Notes *
  • 10 - Russia, 1790–1830 224
  • Notes 242
  • Index 248
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