Modernism and Cultural Conflict, 1880-1922

By Ann L. Ardis | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

My intellectual debts are many, and are recognized in endnotes throughout. I take this opportunity to thank the institutions and foundations that helped to underwrite the research and writing of this book. The National Endowment for the Humanities provided a summer grant in 1994 for work on D. H. Lawrence and early cinema. The Office of the Vice Provost for Academic Programs and Planning at the University of Delaware funded Anne Thalheimer's cite-checking of the final manuscript, and Morris Library's staff facilitated both the purchase of the New Age microfilm for its collection and innumerable interlibrary loans for me. Cambridge University Press's readers provided invaluable suggestions on the final draft. Earlier versions of material in several chapters appeared as essays under the following titles: “Beatrice Webb's Romance with Ethnography, Women's Studies 18, 2/3 (Fall 1990), 1–15; “Shakespeare and Mrs. Grundy: Modernizing Literary Value in the 1890s, Transforming Genres: New Approaches to British Fiction in the 1890s, ed. Meri-Jane Rochelson and Nikki Lee Manos (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1994), pp. 1–20; “Delimiting Modernism and the Literary Field: D. H. Lawrence and The Lost Girl, Outside Modernism: In Pursuit of the English Novel, 1900–30, ed. Nancy Paxton and Lynne Hapgood (London and New York: Palgrave Macmillan/St. Martin's, 2000), pp. 123–44; “Reading 'as a Modernist'/De-naturalizing Modernist Reading Protocols: Wyndham Lewis's Tarr, Rereading Modernism: New Directions inFeminist Criticism, ed. Lisa Rado (New York and London: Garland Press, 1994), pp. 373–90; “Netta Syrett's Aestheticization of Everyday Life: Countering the 'Counterdiscourse' of Aestheticism, in New Approaches to British Aestheticism, ed. Talia Schaffer and Kathy Psomiades (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1999), pp. 233–50; and “Toward a Redefinition of Experimental Writing: Netta Syrett's Realism, 1908–1912, Famous Last Words: Women Against Novelistic Endings, ed. Alison Booth (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1993), pp. 259–79. For permission

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