Abused Men: The Hidden Side of Domestic Violence

By Philip W. Cook | Go to book overview

Chapter 2

Telling Their Stories:
Men Speak Out

Before we hear some abused men's personal stories, I will briefly discuss how the following interviews were conducted.

All the names, unless specifically noted, have been changed. About thirty victims from the western United States were interviewed, and a representative sample of these interviews is presented here. Locations, where necessary to mention, were changed or generalized. Identity protection was sometimes necessary to obtain the interview because some of the men feared retribution. Remaining anonymous allowed these men to speak more freely. Occupations and other identifying characteristics were changed but kept in general context. In one case, the actual names of the people involved were used because the information came from a public source.

In some instances, the story of the abused man is given as a general narrative with only slight editing—in cases where the flow of the interview lent itself well to simply repeating what he had to say. In other cases, a question-and-answer type of interview is used because it more clearly demonstrates how they were feeling or how their response to a particular question was significant.

In providing general themes for the men's stories, I have relied heavily on both the interviews conducted with abused men in a thesis by Canadian Lesley Gregorash and Malcolm George's report to Parliament in England. 1 The Sacramento, California, support group reports provided by Curt Engbritson were also used in finding some cohesion of views. 2

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Abused Men: The Hidden Side of Domestic Violence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Abused Men *
  • Contents *
  • Figures *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction *
  • Chapter 1 - Is It Real?: the Evidence for a Significant Social Problem *
  • Chapter 2 - Telling Their Stories: Men Speak Out *
  • Chapter 3 - The Domestic Violence Trap: How to Get Help and Find Freedom from Abuse *
  • Chapter 4 - Resistance and Acceptance: the Challenge to Understanding *
  • Chapter 5 - Exploring New Approaches to Reducing Domestic Violence *
  • Notes *
  • Selected Bibliography *
  • Selected Resources *
  • Index *
  • About the Author *
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