Capitalists against Markets: The Making of Labor Markets and Welfare States in the United States and Sweden

By Peter A. Swenson | Go to book overview

A NOTE ON SOURCES

This book draws on many primary and secondary sources. Of greatest importance for the discussion on the United States is the vast secondary literature in history, political science, sociology, and economics. The scale and resources of the country's system of research universities has made available a rich supply of information to draw on without direct recourse to primary sources. Of course the best of the secondary literature brought a wealth of archival evidence to light for use in the analysis. The Hagley Museum and Library in Wilmington, Delaware, houses a few of the archives directly consulted, especially the collection of the National Association of Manufacturers. Box and file designations for the NAM documents cited may have changed, for, unfortunately, the entire collection has undergone reorganization. Use was also made of transcribed interviews with Marion Folsom, Arthur Altmeyer, and Herbert Lehman housed at the Columbia University Oral History Collection, Columbia University, New York. Newspapers, especially the New York Times, and other periodical literature also proved invaluable.

By contrast, the research on Sweden relies heavily on archival sources, although I also draw on practically all the secondary research available. Most valuable by far were minutes transcribed from meetings of the board of directors (styrelsen) of SAF (Svenska Arbetsgivareföreningen), the Swedish Employers' Confederation, and of its directors' conferences (ombudsmannakonferenser; later förbundsdirektörskonferenser). The former consisted of full-time company executives and owners, usually prominent ones, elected by the confederation's membership. The latter included the full-time executive leadership of SAF and of its sectoral affiliates. Other important collections consulted at SAF were those of former executive director Bertil Kugelberg, who granted me permission to consult his extensive notes from conversations (minnesanteckningar) and other documents. I also consulted minutes of meetings at VF (Verkstads

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