International Copyright: Principles, Law, and Practice

By Paul Goldstein | Go to book overview
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A6.
UNIVERSAL COPYRIGHT CONVENTION
[PARIS TEXT, 1971]
The Contracting States, Moved by the desire to ensure in all countries copyright protection of literary, scientific and artistic works,Convinced that a system of copyright protection appropriate to all nations of the world and expressed in a universal convention, additional to, and without impairing international systems already in force, will ensure respect for the rights of the individual and encourage the development of literature, the sciences and the arts,Persuaded that such a universal copyright system will facilitate a wider dissemination of works of the human mind and increase international understanding,Have resolved to revise the Universal Copyright Convention as signed at Geneva on 6 September 1952 (hereinafter called “the 1952 Convention”), and consequently,Have agreed as follows:
ARTICLE I
Each Contracting State undertakes to provide for the adequate and effective protection of the rights of authors and other copyright proprietors in literary, scientific and artistic works, including writings, musical, dramatic and cinematographic works, and paintings, engravings and sculpture.
ARTICLE II
1. Published works of nationals of any Contracting State and works first published in that State shall enjoy in each other Contracting State the same protection as that other State accords to works of its nationals first published in its own territory, as well as the protection specially granted by this Convention.
2. Unpublished works of nationals of each Contracting State shall enjoy in each other Contracting State the same protection as that other State accords to unpublished works of its own nationals, as well as the protection specially granted by this Convention.
3. For the purpose of this Convention any Contracting State may, by domestic legislation, assimilate to its own nationals any person domiciled in that State.

ARTICLE III
1. Any Contracting State which, under its domestic law, requires as a condition of copyright, compliance with formalities such as deposit, registration, notice,

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International Copyright: Principles, Law, and Practice
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