International Copyright: Principles, Law, and Practice

By Paul Goldstein | Go to book overview

A21.
BUENOS AIRES CONVENTION

[Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 11, 1910]


ARTICLE 1

The signatory States acknowledge and protect the rights of Literary and Artistic Property in conformity with the stipulations of the present Convention.


ARTICLE 2

In the expression “Literary and Artistic Works” are included books, writings, pamphlets of all kinds, whatever may be the subject of which they treat, and whatever the number of their pages; dramatic or dramatico-musical works; choreographic and musical compositions, with or without words; drawings, paintings, sculpture, engravings; photographic works; astronomical or geographical globes; plans, sketches or plastic works relating to geography, geology or topography, architecture or any other science; and, finally, all productions that can be published by any means of impression or reproduction.


ARTICLE 3

The acknowledgement of a copyright obtained in one State, in conformity with its laws, shall produce its effects of full right in all the other States, without the necessity of complying with any other formality, provided always there shall appear in the work a statement that indicates the reservation of the property right.


ARTICLE 4

The copyright of a literary or artistic work includes for its author or assigns the exclusive power of disposing of the same, of publishing, assigning, translating or authorizing its translation and reproducing it in any form whether wholly or in part.


ARTICLE 5

The author of a protected work, except in case of proof to the contrary, shall be considered the person whose name or well known nom-de-plume is indicated therein; consequently suit brought by such author or his representative against counterfeiters or violators shall be admitted by the Courts of the Signatory States.


ARTICLE 6

The authors or their assigns, citizens or domiciled foreigners, shall enjoy in the signatory countries the rights that the respective laws accord, without those rights being allowed to exceed the term of protection granted in the country of origin.

-482-

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