Making Law in the United States Courts of Appeals

By David E. Klein | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am grateful to a number of people and institutions who helped to make this a better book than it otherwise would have been. Prominent among them are the twenty-four circuit judges whom I cannot name here but who gave generously of their time to a graduate student and project they knew nothing about. (Many more judges were gracious enough to grant my request for an interview, but I was unable to work out the logistical details with them. )

The Ohio State University provided crucial assistance in the project's early stages through a Graduate Student Alumni Research Award. The University of Virginia helped me to complete the analysis and writing of this work through a Sesquicentennial research leave, Summer Research Grant, and Rowland Egger grant.

In the course of the work, I ran into some tricky methodological issues. Kevin Rask, Donald Richards, and Christopher Zorn kindly helped me work through them.

Darby Morrisroe provided able research assistance and collaborated in the development and validation of the measure of judicial prestige described in Chapter 4.

Eric Newman and my mother, Sheila Klein, provided valuable editorial advice. My wife, Tina Rask, helped with some of the most tedious work, including checking citations.

William Landes, Mary Mattingly, Richard Posner, Donald Songer, Isaac Unah, and Stephen Wasby each read some piece of this study in an earlier version and provided valuable suggestions.

Elliot Slotnick and Gregory Caldeira read a substantial segment of the final product in an earlier incarnation. Harold Spaeth and an anonymous

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