China in the World Market: Chinese Industry and International Sources of Reform in the Post-Mao Era

By Thomas G. Moore | Go to book overview

Appendix: Contours of the
Research Effort

A NOTE ON METHODOLOGY

Within the framework of industry-specific analysis, there are two basic methodological approaches that can be employed: large-n analysis (statistical examination of a large number of cases) or small-n analysis (indepth studies of a small number of cases). While possible in the abstract, large-n analysis is not an especially good candidate for addressing the research agenda pursued in this book. First, the number of well-recorded case studies involving individual Chinese industries is quite small at present. Consequently, large-n analysis would require primary data collection for many industries. While basic information about many industries is supplied in national, provincial, and ministerial yearbooks, the available data varies widely on several counts: degree of detail, consistency of reporting practices, and the number of possible sources. While data on China's economy has been improving steadily, information remains incomplete in one respect or another for many industries. This was especially true for the 1980s, when reports on Chinese industries were still often superficial, haphazardly documented from year to year, and nearly impossible to verify even by the most rudimentary methods (e.g., comparing different sources). Simply put, there is not enough wellrecorded data about a sufficient number of industries in order to conduct large-n analysis consistent with my research agenda.

Second, it can be argued that case-study analysis is simply better-suited for the task at hand. Even if the limitations of large-n analysis did not exist for the study of Chinese industries, small-n analysis would still provide greater opportunity to trace the process by which independent variables affect dependent variables. Put another way, the decisive evidence necessary to establish the causal relationship between degrees of

-316-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
China in the World Market: Chinese Industry and International Sources of Reform in the Post-Mao Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 343

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.