The Rise of Professionalism: A Sociological Analysis

By Magali Sarfatti Larson | Go to book overview

Chapter 8
PROFESSIONAL PRIVILEGE IN A DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY

Professions came of age in America after the Civil War, a period in which economic, administrative, and political power were consolidated and centralized. In the period between 1870 and 1920, the establishment of national organizational nuclei served by vast bureaucracies was so distinctive that many authors, following Kenneth Boulding, refer to it as the "organizational revolution." They tend to see it as the rather paradoxical culmination of the "great transformation" which had begun half a century earlier under the auspices of laissez-faire.

Corinne Gilb observes, for instance, that "professional organizations came relatively late in the organizational revolution" and suggests that "to articulate and sustain the new and needed levels of professionalism, and to hold their own in a society whose various other members were increasingly organized, the professions, too, formed organizations."1 It is true that neither in Europe nor in the United States did professional organizations attain their present form or create their present relationships with state power until this century.2 The radical changes in the larger market had fundamental consequences for the structure of professions, old and new, as they strove to establish or maintain their own secondary markets of services. To these general consequences I shall return later. We can expect them to be more visible, widespread, and far-reaching in the United States than in other advanced capitalist countries. Indeed, in America's passage from local or regional to national organizations, all the central institutions were distinctively formed or transformed: the structure of the federal government, the corporate nuclei of industrial capitalism, the industrial trade unions, the educational system, and the professions bear little resemblance to the institutional forms which fulfilled their functions before this phase, in which the United States became the world's leading industrial power.3

It would be misleading, however, to assume that there was a total discontinuity between the early attempts at professionalization and the consolidated forms of mature and successful professionalism. The professional project can be identified by its related objectives of market monopoly and social status. These goals were pursued at different times by different groups of professional reformers, using the resources that were accessible in their specific environments. The "organizational revolution" did not so much alter the nature of the professional project as it altered

-104-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Rise of Professionalism: A Sociological Analysis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 312

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.