Daniel Boone, Master of the Wilderness

By John Bakeless | Go to book overview

3.

Goodbye to the World

FATE came plodding down the Yadkin Valley Road one day, leading a pack-horse. Fate had for the moment assumed the guise of a backwoods peddler, and his name was John Finley. It was nearly fourteen years since Boone and he had fled for their lives after Braddock's defeat.

There is no reason to suppose that the two men had ever met since. There was no particular reason why they should ever have met again; men scattered far and wide upon that wild frontier. And yet one day John Finley with his peddler's pack drew up at Daniel Boone's cabin door. He was just one more of those itinerant merchants who wandered with their moveable stores among the backwoods settlements, which were so nearly self‐ sufficing that a merchant with an ordinary country store would have starved to death. Still, there were a few things backwoods ingenuity could not produce; and frontier wives and daughters loved bright ribbons, fine cloth, odd knick-knacks as much as any other women.

Years later, in Missouri, Daniel's son Nathan remembered Finley; how he stabled his spare nags in the Boone stables; and most of all he remembered the yarns Finley spun beside the cabin fire. Kaintuck'—there was a land for you. Game in such abundance as no man dreamed of. A deer at every lick. Buffalo thick upon the traces. Herds so huge that a man had to be careful lest he be crushed to death in their mad stampedes. The

-44-

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Daniel Boone, Master of the Wilderness
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Daniel Boone *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • Introduction to the Bison Book Edition *
  • Introduction *
  • 1 - The Boones of Pennsylvania 3
  • 2 - To the Yadkin Valley 15
  • 3 - Goodbye to the World 44
  • 4 - First Attempt at Settlement 66
  • 5 - Public War, Private Treaty 81
  • 6 - The Wilderness Road 89
  • 7 - Life at Boonesborough 110
  • 8 - Three Kidnapped Daughters 124
  • 9 - Year of the Three Sevens 141
  • 10 - Prisoner of the Shawnee King 156
  • 11 - Sheltowee, the Ingrate 178
  • 12 - Blackfish Lays Siege 195
  • 13 - Treasons or Stratagems? 229
  • 14 - Red-Skinned Raiders 239
  • 15 - The Year of Blood: Siege of Bryan's Station 263
  • 16 - The Year of Blood: Death at the Blue Licks 288
  • 17 - The Thirteen Fires 310
  • 18 - Land Trouble 340
  • 19 - Elbow-Room 351
  • 20 - Last Frontier 384
  • Acknowledgments 419
  • Bibliographical Essay 425
  • Notes 435
  • Index 469
  • About the Author *
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