Albert & Thomas: Selected Writings

By Simon Tugwell | Go to book overview

Obedience and the Vows
De Perfectione, Chapter 13

The error of those who take it upon themselves to lessen the merit of obedience and the vows.

The devil resents human perfection. He has therefore raised up various pretentious and rebellious teachers to attack the ways of perfection. The first way of perfection (poverty) was attacked by Vigilantius, and Jerome replied to him in these words: "He claims that it is better to make use of one's possessions and distribute the income from one's property little by little. There is no need for me to answer such a claim, the answer is given by the Lord himself: 'If you want to be perfect, go and sell all that you have and give it to the poor and come, follow me.' He is addressing someone who wants to be perfect, who is ready, with the apostles, to abandon father, ship and nets. The way of life you recommend ranks second or third. We accept it too, provided it is recognized.that the best comes before the second best, and the second best before the third." 1.

It is to preclude this error that is says in the Ecclesiastical Dogmas, "It is a good thing to provide resources for the poor on a regular basis, but it is better to give away everything at once with the intention of following Christ and, free from worldly cares, to be poor with Christ." 2.

The second way of perfection (chastity) was attacked by Jovinian, who made marriage equal to virginity. His error is manifestly refuted by Jerome in the book which he wrote against him. Augustine also refers to his error in his Retractationes: "Jovinian's heresy tried to make the merit of holy virgins the same as that of married chastity, and it was so influential in Rome that even some nuns, who

____________________
1.
Jerome, Contra Vigilantium 14 (PL 23:350D-351A), quoting Matt. 19:21. In Thomas' time there were some people who wanted to revive Vigilantius' contention that wealth was an aid to virtue: cf. A. Murray in G. J. Cuming and D. Baker, eds., Popular Belief and Practice (Cambridge, 1972), p. 91.
2.
Gennadius, De Eccles. Dogm. 38 (PL 42:1219).

-589-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Albert & Thomas: Selected Writings
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 650

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.