Women's Poetry and Religion in Victorian England: Jewish Identity and Christian Culture

By Cynthia Scheinberg | Go to book overview

Index
Abrahams, Beth-Zion Lask, 150, 151, 153–4, 250 n.2, 8, 252 n.23
Aguilar, Grace, 5, 6, 20, 22, 23–4, 61, 146–89, 224; accused of Jewish Protestantism, 153–5; Biblical references: Leviticus, 26: 40–1, 186, I Kings, 19: 12, 172, Proverbs, 168; compared to Elizabeth Barrett Browning, 176–7; compared to Samuel Taylor Coleridge, 165–6; compared to Amy Levy, 196–97, 199–200, 204, 205, 224, 232–3, 234; construction of religious authority, 150; construction of literary authority 20, 147, 183; Jewish education, 251 n.12; and Isaac Leeser, 152, 157, 158, 176, 252 n.29; and Biblical women: Deborah, 174, 178, 180–3, Hannah, 174, 178–80, Miriam, 174, 176–8, 180; manuscript copy books, 153; and public/private spheres, 155–60, 162, see also separate spheres; and Romantic poetics, 160–4, 166–7, 169; use of Christian typology, 184–5; and the Voice of Jacob,147, 151, 180; and William Wordsworth, 161–2; Works: “Angels: Written While Watching At Past Midnight, Alone By the Bedside of a Beloved Friend, 165–7, “The Authoress, 149–50, 161, 181, Communings with Nature,163, “The Evergreen, 163–5, 166, 167, The Days of Bruce: A Story of Scottish History,152, Essays and Miscellanies,152, Home Influence,151, 152, Home Scenes and Hearth Studies,152, Israel Defended,152, The Jewish Faith: Its Spiritual Consolation, Moral Guidance, and Immortal Hope, 146, 148–9, 151, The Magic Wreath,152, A Mother's Recompense,152, The Records of Israel, 152, 252 n.29, “The Rocks of Elim, 252 n.26, Sabbath Thoughts,167–70, 173, 186, “Sabbath Thoughts I” 168–70, “Sabbath Thoughts VI, 170–2, The Spirit of Judaism, 147, 148, 152, 156, 157, 161, 169, 175, The Vale of Cedars; or The Martyr,152, “A Vision of Jerusalem: While Listening to a Beautiful Organ in One of the Gentile Shrines, 22, 183–8, The Women of Israel,161–2, 173–82
anti-Judaism, 31, 36, 44, 58; distinguished from anti-Semitism, 37; see also Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Christina Rossetti
anti-Semitism, 37, 57, 131, 247 n.6
ap Roberts, Ruth, 241 n.16
Armstrong, Isobel, 8, 212
Arnold, Matthew, 27, 38, 45, 52, 53, 55–60, 184; Hebraism, 57–9, 211; analysis of Robert Burns, 206; compared with Amy Levy, 206–12; Works:Culture and Anarchy,55, 57–60, 210, “Heinrich Heine, 55–7, 208–10, “The Study of Poetry, 206, 211
Ayre, John, Reverend, 85
Barrett Browning, Elizabeth, 5, 6, 20, 22, 28, 61, 62–105, 224; Biblical references: Deuteronomy, 75, 79, Exodus, 91, 92, 95–6, 98, 102, Genesis, 72, Isaiah, 70, Luke, 1: 31, 78, Psalm LXXX, 70, Revelation, 21: 1–20, 102; compared to Christina Rossetti, 68, 103–4, 111, 144; compared to Grace Aguilar, 176–7; construction of female poetic identity, 28, 65, 89, 95–8, 101–3, 104–5; figuration of Mary, 79–84; figuration of Miriam, 22, 69, 76, 84–7, 89–105; figuration of Moses, 79–90, 92, 95–100, 102; and Hebrew language, 67, 70, 71, 76; and Jewish Biblical women, 68, 69, 79, 89–105; and Jewishness, 63–7, 73–6, 79–80, 89–105; and John Milton, 72, 77; and Mary Russell Mitford, 62, 63, 64, 243, n.6; relationship to Hebrew language, 28, 63, 67, 70, 73–4, 79; religious affiliation, 67; and Richard Hengist Horne, 62–5, 242 n.4; and Robert Browning, 104–5; and Robert Burns, 66; use of Christian typology, 20, 22, 87–94, 98, 104; Works: Aurora Leigh,21–3, 28, 67, 68, 76, 84–104, 144, “Drama of Exile, 28, Poems (1844), 71, “The Seraphim, 28, 244 n.22, The Seraphim

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