The Winning Message: Candidate Behavior, Campaign Discourse, and Democracy

By Adam F. Simon | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3
Understanding Campaigns: Background,
Theory, and Methods

In this chapter, I present the foundations for a scientific inquiry into the occurrence of campaign dialogue. In the first section I discuss the recent history of campaigns focusing on the change wrought by the advent of television and sample surveys. The point of this discussion is to contextualize and to establish the importance of this study as well as the importance of treating the campaign as a holistic phenomenon. Next, I move to review extant understanding of the campaign, especially the so-called Michigan and Rochester schools and the notion of low information rationality. I conclude with a sketch of a theory of campaigns that forms the basis for the formal (game-theoretic) model in the next chapter.

Onlookers have been complaining about the quality of public discourse for quite some time. As I observed in the previous chapter, the ferocity of this criticism has not decreased. In the current milieu, however, the most common response to critics of contemporary political campaigns — that they have always been shallow and we can expect little more — fails to acknowledge the increasing need for substance. Not so long ago, party organizations, exemplified by the smoke-filled backroom, were the centerpiece of American politics. They served as a conduit for passing information as well as a means toward gaining votes. The party filtered and transferred information between constituents and elected officials, so parties were responsible for organizing and facilitating the communication between government and the public necessary in a complex democracy (Aldrich 1995; Sundquist 1973).

Recently, however, a cluster of political, technological, and sociological changes — especially television and the sample survey — has cleared the smoke, fundamentally disturbing this channel between the public and officials (Bennett 1992; Kernell 1988; Polsby 1983). This new mode

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Winning Message: Candidate Behavior, Campaign Discourse, and Democracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 181

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.