Coping with Life and Death: Jewish Families in the Twentieth Century

By Peter Y. Medding | Go to book overview

Notes

This essay was written at the invitation of Michael Heyd and Shaul Katz, and was begun during the tenure of an Edelstein International Fellowship at the Hebrew University. I am grateful to them and to the Edelstein Foundation: I wish also to express my thanks to the staff of the Central Zionist Archives, Jerusalem, and to Leanne Piggott, of the University of Sydney, for their assistance in securing sources in preparation of this article.

1
Arthur J. Balfour, “On Great Britain and Zionism, in Opinions and Argument from Speeches and Addresses, 1920–1927 of the Earl of Balfour, KG, OM, FRS (London: 1927), 231–235.
2
Three biographies of Balfour were published during his lifetime—those of Bernard Alderston, Arthur James Balfour (London: 1903); W. M. Short (ed. ), Arthur James Balfour as Philosopher and Thinker (London: 1912); and Denis Judd, Balfour and the British Empire (London: 1918). His contemporaries welcomed two more soon after his death—by Sir Ian Malcolm, Lord Balfour: A Memory (London: 1930), and by his niece, Blanche E. C. Dugdale, Arthur James Balfour, First Earl of Balfour, 2 vols. (London: 1936).

In recent years, there have been several biographies and interpretative essays. See Kenneth Young, Arthur James Balfour: The Happy Life of the Politician, PM, Statesman and Philosopher 1848–1930 (London: 1963); A. M. Gollin, Balfour's Burden: Arthur Balfour and Imperial Preference (London: 1965); Richard A. Rempel, Unionists Divided: Arthur Balfour, Joseph Chamberlain and the Unionist Free Traders (Hamden, Conn: 1972); and, concerning his years as chief secretary for Ireland, L. P. Curtis, Jr., Coercion and Conciliation in Ireland, 1880–1892 (Princeton: 1963). For more recent work, see Sydney H. Zebel, Balfour: A Political Biography (Cambridge: 1973); John Ramsden, The Age of Balfour and Baldwin (London: 1978); Max Egremont, Balfour (London 1980); Peter Fraser, “Arthur James Balfour, in British Prime Ministers in the Twentieth Century, ed. John P. Macintosh (London: 1977); and Ruddock F. Mackay, Balfour: Intellectual Statesman (Oxford: 1985). See also Balfour's extensive writings, as well as his Essays and Addresses (Edinburgh: 1893) and Chapters of Autobiography (London: 1930).

3
See Lord Rayleigh, Lord Balfour in His Relation to Science (Cambridge: 1930), 11.
4
Ibid., 16.
5
Quoted in Kenneth Rose, Superior Person: A Portrait of Curzon and His Circle (London: 1969), 380–381.
6
Rayleigh, Lord Balfour in His Relation to Science, 20. Also see L. S. Jacyna, “Science and Social Order in the Thought of A. J. Balfour, Isis 71 (1980), 11–34.
7
For Balfour's contribution to the British Association to the Advancement of Science (BAAS), see Roy MacLeod and Peter Collins (eds. ), The Parliament of Science: Essays in Honor of the British Association (London: 1981).
8
See Meyer W. Weisgal (ed. ), Letters and Papers of Chaim Weizmann, vol. 4 (London: 1975), xxv.
9
See Blanche Dugdale, Chaim Weizmann (New York: 1944), 131.
10
Roy MacLeod and Kay Andrews, “Scientific Advice on the War at Sea, 1915–1917: The Board of Invention and Research, Journal of Contemporary History 6, no. 2 (1971), 3–40.
11
See Dugdale, Chaim Weizmann; and Chaim Weizmann, Trial and Error (New York: 1949), vol.1, 132–133. For more recent accounts, see Robert Bud, The Uses of Life: A History of Biochemistry (Cambridge: 1993), 37–45; Barnet Litvinoff, The Essential Chaim Weizmann: The Man, the Statesman, the Scientist (London: 1982), 243–246; Jehuda Reinharz, Chaim Weizmann: The Making of a Zionist Leader (New York: 1985), ch.15; and Norman Rose, Chaim Weizmann: A Biography (London: 1986), 152–153.
12
See Katheleen Burk, Britain, America and the Sinews of War (Boston: 1985).
13
See Eric Ashby, Community of Universities: An Informal Portrait of the Association of Universities of the British Commonwealth, 1913–1963 (Cambridge: 1963), 18–22.
14
On the Balfour Declaration, see, for example, Leonard Stein, The Balfour Declaration (London: 1961); and Christopher Sykes, Crossroads to Israel (Cleveland: 1965).
15
The story has its origins in David Lloyd George, War Memoirs (London: 1933), vol. 2,

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