Online Communication: Linking Technology, Identity, and Culture

By Andrew F. Wood; Matthew J. Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9
CARVING ALTERNATIVE SPACES

This is not the age of pamphleteers. It is the age of the engineers. The spark-gap is mightier than the pen.

—Lancelot Hogben

Do you agree with the above quotation? Before you decide, consider this case. In 2003, as the United States prepared to go to war in Iraq for the second time in little more than a decade, billions of people around the world awaited news of the first strikes. As aircraft streaked through the skies and troops hurtled across miles of desert, the attack inspired countless responses and personal reflections. Was the war morally justified? Would the Iraqis respond with chemical weapons? What was going on in Baghdad? In previous conflicts, most people would wait for traditional news media to sift through questions such as these, crafting their responses to second-hand accounts from events shrouded in the “fog of war. ” In the Internet Age, however, we did not depend on formal journalists to provide our only account of the war. The short attention spans of broadcast news programs and limited space of newspapers, even those promising to report “all the news fit to print, ” began to compete with self-styled journalists who used blogs to offer alternative views of the war.

In Baghdad, a 29-year-old blogger nicknamed Salam Pax challenged the assumption communicated by the Bush administration that Iraqi citizens would throng American troops immediately on their arrival, celebrating their liberation from the dictatorial regime of Saddam Hussein. Larsen (2003) quotes him as writing, “There are no waving masses of people welcoming the Americans nor are they surrendering by the thousands—People are doing what all of us are, sitting in their homes hoping that a bomb doesn't fall on them” (p. 26). Begun as an extended conversation with friends from architecture school, Salam Pax's blog became transformed into a vivid account of life in the crosshairs. Branded a tool of the CIA, pursued by the Iraqi secret police, Pax become an international sensation because of his ability to use the Internet to share his voice and reflect on his anger at both sides of the conflict. Recently, he has published a book of his missives and attained a striking degree of fame for his witty and acerbic blog. Suddenly, the scared and angry fellow hiding in his parent's house has become an author with a place for his words in bookstores around the world.

And Salam Pax is not alone. Today across the globe, activists who might have been shut out of the public arena have found a powerful tool in the Internet (Coombs, 1998). Certainly, this network of networks can be blocked by various means. Many companies protect themselves with firewalls—software and hardware barriers that restrict access to and from their internal networks. Many parents, schools, libraries, and

-179-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Online Communication: Linking Technology, Identity, and Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Brief Contents vi
  • Detailed Contents vii
  • Preface xiv
  • Part I - The Internet as Social Technology 1
  • Chapter 1 - Using Technology to Communicate in New Ways 3
  • References *
  • Chapter 2 - Understanding How New Communication Technologies Work 29
  • References *
  • Part II - The Self Among Others 49
  • References *
  • Chapter 3 - Forming Online Identities 51
  • References *
  • Chapter 4 - Relating Online 78
  • References *
  • Chapter 5 - Seeking Therapy Online 101
  • References *
  • Chapter 6 - Communicating in Virtual Communities 122
  • References 142
  • Part III - Internet Culture and Critique 145
  • References *
  • Chapter 7 - Rebuilding Corporations Online 147
  • References *
  • Chapter 8 - Accessing the Machine 166
  • References *
  • Chapter 9 - Carving Alternative Spaces 179
  • References *
  • Chapter 10 - Pop Culture and Online Expression 194
  • References *
  • Appendix A - Introduction to Hypertext Markup Language 213
  • Appendix B - Researching the Internet Experience 222
  • References 226
  • Glossary 227
  • Author Index 235
  • Subject Index 240
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 245

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.