Online Communication: Linking Technology, Identity, and Culture

By Andrew F. Wood; Matthew J. Smith | Go to book overview

GLOSSARY

ACE model: A theoretical explanation for the allure of the Internet that suggests that the qualities of accessibility, control, and excitement lead to IAD.

Ad hoc communities: Communities of individuals brought together by an unforeseen event.

Agonistic communication: Discourse that produces or invokes ritualized conflict with an established order.

Agora: An open meeting space within the Greek city of Athens, commonly used for transacting all kinds of social exchanges.

Analytical engine: A 19th-century concept that serves as the predecessor to the modern computer.

Anonymity: Communication without one's identity being apparent.

Anticipatory conformity: Adopting a docile and disciplined relationship to authority because of the potential rather than the practice of domination.

Apa: Amateur press association, an imagined community sustained by members who distribute self-published periodicals to one another.

ARPANET: Early computer network designed for the U. S. Defense Department.

Artifacts: Bits and pieces of human sense-making: books, magazines, movies, posters, comics, and the like.

Asynchronous communication: The exchangeof messages with significant lag time between them.

Avatar: An incarnation of oneself in a virtual environment.

Bandwidth: The resources (including others' patience) consumed by messages in online forums; originally bandwidth referenced the carrying capacity of media delivery systems, such as a cable line.

Blog: A journal-likeWebsite where authors regularly post new contributions of prose, poetry, hypertext links, and other materials for readers.

Browser: A software program that interprets information from the Internet and displays it as text, images, animation, and sounds (e.g., Mosaic, Netscape Navigator, Microsoft Explorer).

Bulletin board system (BBS): A publicly accessible collection of organized messages posted by various contributors.

Chronemics: The use of time as a nonverbal channel for communicating qualities such as liking or dominance.

Command and control: The channeling of information to ensure that individuals act efficiently as a unit.

Computer anxiety: Fear of using or considering using computer technology.

Computer-assisted therapy (CAT) programs: Software that provides an interactive, conversational experience with alleged mental health benefits (e.g., ELIZA).

Computer-mediated communication (CMC): The ways in which human behaviors are maintained or altered by exchange of information through machines.

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