Festivals of Freedom: Memory and Meaning in African American Emancipation Celebrations, 1808-1915

By Mitch Kachun | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER TWO
“A BORROWED DAY OF JUBILEE”
MATURATION, 1834–1862

From bright West Indies' sunny seas, Comes, borne upon the balmy breeze, The joyous shout, the gladsome tone, Long in those bloody isles unknown; Bearing across the heaving wave The song of the unfettered slave.

—J. M. Whitfield, August 1, 1849

I like these annual celebrations because they call us to the contemplation of great interests, and afford an opportunity of presenting salutary truths before the American people. They bring our people together, and enable us to see and commune with each other to mutual profit.

—Frederick Douglass, August 1, 1857

W HEN GREAT BRITAIN'S act emancipating the approximately 670,000 slaves in its West Indian colonies went into effect on August 1, 1834, it did not immediately inspire much celebration among blacks in the United States. One reason may be that the date fell just after a July Fourth protest parade in New York City had resulted in several days of antiblack rioting. The event was, like many antebellum “race” riots, a white assault on blacks claiming their right to public political expression, and it reinforced the recent resolution by the 1834 National Convention of Free People of Colour “that we disapprove, will discountenance and suppress, so far as we have the power or influence, the exhibition and procession usually held on the fifth of July annually, in the city of New-York; and all other processions of coloured people, not necessary for the interment of the dead. The convention criticized such parades for being wasteful of limited financial resources and tending “to increase the prejudice and contempt of whites. The resolution at least implicitly denounced the persistent African-based traditions of music, dance, and “pomp in dress” that such occasions inspired. After “a very protracted debate” the resolution passed with just two dissenters, one of whom, perhaps not surprisingly, was Samuel Hardenburgh, a frequent marshal in New York's extravagant Emancipation Day parades. 1

-54-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Festivals of Freedom: Memory and Meaning in African American Emancipation Celebrations, 1808-1915
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 339

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.