Feminism beyond Modernism

By Elizabeth A. Flynn | Go to book overview

2
Reading Global Feminisms

[C]ategories often invoked disparagingly by feminist theorists—equality, reason, history, modernity—are not stable, uniform entities but are reproduced and changed by the specific context of their articulation. It is here that much of feminist philosophy, with its sweeping vision of the longue durée of Western history as a history of pathological phallocentrism, reveals its limitations.

—Rita Felski, “The Doxa of Difference”

As the history of Western women makes clear, there is no validity to the notion that progress for women can be achieved only by abandoning the ways of a native androcentric culture in favor of those of another culture.

—Leila Ahmed, Women and Gender in Islam: Historical Roots of a Modern Debate

It is another form of oppression and colonialism, the colonialism of Western feminists.

—Nawal Saadawi and Mary E. Willmurth,
“A Feminist in the Arab World”

As I have suggested, postmodern feminism moves beyond modernism by challenging and problematizing it rather than replacing, opposing, or nullifying it. Theorists, such as Bakhtin, Lyotard, Derrida, Foucault, and Kristeva, and postmodern feminists influenced by their work criticize modernist projects but do not directly oppose them. They do not repudiate science, rationality, epistemology, or liberal democracy but make clear their serious limitations. Postmodern feminists criticize modernist tendencies to universalize, to focus on the individual divorced from social context, and to ignore the ways in which local situations affect interpretive processes. They also attempt to find alternatives to modern feminisms and sometimes draw heavily upon the work of male theorists and practitioners. It is antimodern feminists who, more often, associate male institutions and discourses with androcentrism and patriarchy and reject them entirely.

Feminisms are historically and geographically situated and hence context specific. Concepts such as equality, for instance, that were privileged during the Enlightenment, can be reclaimed to serve postmodern feminist ends. Rita Felski finds in “The Doxa of Difference” that critiquing the notion of equality implies

-44-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Feminism beyond Modernism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 215

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.