Baseball's Natural: The Story of Eddie Waitkus

By John Theodore | Go to book overview

7
Baseball Annies

The Waitkus shooting put a national spotlight on the huge number of teenage girls throughout major league cities who spent much of their summers chasing their baseball heroes. A Time magazine reporter who interviewed Waitkus while he was still in the hospital wrote: “He sat up in bed and tolerantly described Ruth as a 'Baseball Annie, ' one of an army of heroworshiping teen-age girls who follow players around. ” The press quickly picked up on Waitkus's description of Steinhagen as a “Baseball Annie” and used it in headlines throughout the country. Teenage girls have always followed baseball players around, and throughout history the athletes have always had their own special names for these girls, including “Baseball Sadie” and “Chicago Shirley. ” Steinhagen, however, was vastly different from these girls who congregated outside the clubhouse doors. If she had actually made contact with Waitkus, either by directly asking him for his autograph or merely talking with him, one psychiatrist theorized, she would not have gone through with the shooting. Instead, she quietly allowed her wild dream to become a reality, changing her life and Waitkus's forever.

Writing for the Sporting News in May 1950, Philadelphia baseball reporter Stan Baumgartner attempted to profile these young, female fans. “The modern 'Baseball Sadie, '” wrote Baumgartner, “is much more dangerous, bold, sex-conscious than her prototype of 20 or 30 years ago. Many come from the 'best' of families. They have good educations, dress in the latest fashions, make up conservatively, and can take their place in any gathering.

“They form fan clubs, have meetings and ask their favorites to attend. Their loyalty sometimes reaches a dangerous stage. They go after their man

-41-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Baseball's Natural: The Story of Eddie Waitkus
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Foreword xv
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Introduction xxiii
  • Major League Career Statistics for Eddie Waitkus xxv
  • Baseball's Natural *
  • 1 - Room 1297 A 1
  • 2 - Building a Dream 6
  • 3 - A Sealed Fate 12
  • 4 - A Swift Judgement Day 16
  • 5 - East Cambridge and Beyond 20
  • 6 - Chicago to Philadelphia 31
  • 7 - Baseball Annies 41
  • 8 - Clearwater Beach 47
  • 9 - Comeback 55
  • 10 - Kankakee State Hospital 61
  • 11 - All the Game's Wild Glory 66
  • 12 - Hero's Journey 83
  • 13 - In the Shadows 89
  • 14 - No Sentiment in Baseball 95
  • 15 - A Quiet Existence 105
  • 16 - Hidden Enemy 115
  • 17 - The Pleasure of Your Own 122
  • 18 - Lost Hero 131
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 136

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.