Volker Schlondorff's Cinema: Adaptation, Politics, and the "Movie-Appropriate"

By Hans-Bernhard Moeller; George Lellis | Go to book overview

20
Death of a Salesman

Now how all this will translate on film we don't know. This is an experiment. I think I'll only try and help how best we can what has been so successful on stage put on film. See that these walls don't quite fit. It is not so much that we wanted to make an economy but to make clear from the beginning and all the way through that this is not a real house. Because if you have that much reality, you don't need that many words any more. This being a play, a reality should be created through the words. If the reality is there anyhow in front of the camera, they don't need to talk that much and it doesn't fit together then. You will contribute greatly by creating reality through your performances. Everything should be fake except for the emotions. They'll be real. And they'll be what we'll be moved by.

—Volker Schlöndorff, addressing the cast of Death of a Salesman
(from Private Conversations)

Death of a Salesman marks a departure for Volker Schlöndorff. It was his first film made in the United States from an American subject, his first Englishlanguage production since Michael Kohlhaas, and his first screen adaptation of a play since Baal. The production, presented on U. S. television on September 15, 1985, was an enormous critical and popular success, racking up ratings twice as good as those for the last television presentation of the play almost twenty years earlier (“'Death' … Doubles 1966 Audience”). With the noted exception of his cinematographer, Michael Ballhaus, Schlöndorff used a largely American crew. Yet despite the new ground broken, Death of a Salesman bears some similarities to Schlöndorff's other works: it was a faithful adaptation of a literary classic; it was made with an aesthetic awareness that its primary use would be on television; and it has a theme typical of Schlöndorff, namely, the damage wrought to human relationships as a result of capitalism.

Schlöndorff's Death of a Salesman was in part an attempt to translate to film

-223-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Volker Schlondorff's Cinema: Adaptation, Politics, and the "Movie-Appropriate"
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 370

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.