Volker Schlondorff's Cinema: Adaptation, Politics, and the "Movie-Appropriate"

By Hans-Bernhard Moeller; George Lellis | Go to book overview
Save to active project

23
A Filmmaker for
the European Community

Schlöndorff's next period, which we call his “Post-Wall” period, is not marked by a completely clear transition but essentially comprises the director's work from 1990 until the present. One might see the period beginning with the fall of the Berlin Wall on November 9, 1989. With the subsequent reunification of Germany, Schlöndorff reorients his attention toward creating a European cinema, first with the production of Voyager and later with his taking over the Babelsberg film studios in Berlin. The Ogre, released in October 1996, is also decisively European in its orientation. This is also a period during which Schlöndorff completed a short television concert documentary, The Michael Nyman Song Book (1992). In a six-part television documentary about Hollywood filmmaker Billy Wilder and in Palmetto (1998), Schlöndorff acknowledges the strong ties Wilder had to Central European traditions and the inverse debt that the younger filmmaker owes to Wilder. He returns to specifically German subject matter in a short film about personnel land mines along the Wall and in The Legend of Rita (2000).

Although Voyager was released in Germany in late 1991, this film, an adaptation of Max Frisch's novel Homo Faber, was one that Schlöndorff had thought about for a long time and had planned to begin even prior to The Handmaid's Tale. Schlöndorff has described what happened in an interview given just before starting Voyager: “I thought it had been waiting 30 years so it could wait a little longer, while The Handmaid's Tale had to be done right away. So I had it postponed. I'm glad I did. I have at last one truly American film behind me, and I can again do this truly European piece” (Van Gelder).

Although it was shot in English with an American star, Sam Shepard, Voyager nonetheless marks a turn away from the American subjects of his preceding three films. Schlöndorff in the same interview described the project as a “strictly European production” and “a trans-Atlantic enterprise. And at the time of its

-265-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Volker Schlondorff's Cinema: Adaptation, Politics, and the "Movie-Appropriate"
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 370

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.