Psychopathology and Politics; Politics: Who Gets What, When, How; Democratic Character

By Harold D. Lasswell | Go to book overview

PUBLISHER'S FOREWORD

In modern political science two volumes have made a special impact because of their originality of content and brevity of expression. One is Professor Lasswell Psychopathology and Politics ( 1930) and the other is his Politics: Who Gets What, When How ( 1936). These books are made conveniently accessible in the present publication, together with a third book, a wholly new treatment of Democratic Character.

Political science is one of the social sciences that has been revolutionized by the epochal advances that have been made in recent years in the study of human personality. Medical psychology has been the greatest source of deeper knowledge of the mind of man, especially since the discovery of psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud. Lasswell's Psychopathology and Politics was the earliest full- scale application of the principles of psychopathology to politics. It was much more than a simple re-statement and formal application of psychopathology to a special topic. With the cooperation of eminent physicians in this country and abroad the intimate life histories of active politicians were collected and analyzed in the light of the insights provided by modern psychiatry. One of the leading sponsors of the research, for example, was the late Dr. William Alanson White who was the superintendent of St. Elizabeth's Hospital, Washington, D. C., the chief government hospital for the care and study of the insane.

In the Psychopathology a sharp distinction is drawn between individuals active in politics, and "political per-

-iii-

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Psychopathology and Politics; Politics: Who Gets What, When, How; Democratic Character
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Publisher's Foreword iii
  • Contents vii
  • Title Page ix
  • Preface xi
  • Contents xiv
  • Chapter I - Life-Histories and Political Science 1
  • Chapter II - The Psychopathological Approach 15
  • Chapter III - A New Technique of Thinking 28
  • Chapter IV - The Criteria of Political Types 38
  • Chapter V - Theories of Personality Development 65
  • Chapter VI - Political Agitators 78
  • Chapter VII - Political Agitators -- Continued 106
  • Chapter VIII - Political Administrators 127
  • Chapter IX - Political Convictions 153
  • Chapter X - The Politics of Prevention 173
  • Chapter XI - The Prolonged Interview and Its Objectification 204
  • Chapter XII - The Personality System and Its Substitutive Reactions 221
  • Chapter XIII - The State as a Manifold of Events 240
  • Appendix A - Select Bibliography 268
  • Appendix B - Question List on Political Practices 276
  • Title Page 287
  • Preface 289
  • Contents 293
  • Part I -- Elite 295
  • Part II -- Methods 311
  • Chapter III - Violence 326
  • Chapter IV - Goods 342
  • Chapter V - Practices 360
  • Part III -- Results 375
  • Chapter VII - Class 392
  • Chapter VIII - Personality 410
  • Chapter IX - Attitude 427
  • Chapter X - RÉsumÉ 443
  • Bibliographical Notes 455
  • Title Page 463
  • Democratic Character 465
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