Genesis as Dialogue: A Literary, Historical, & Theological Commentary

By Thomas L. Brodie | Go to book overview

35
Prophecy and Conversion (37:2-Chap. 38)
Joseph, the Prophetic Dreamer, Is Sold (37:2–36)
Judah's Whoring and Conversion (Chap. 38)

Introductory Aspects

The Basic Story Line

Much of the Joseph narrative is about two sons—a young dreamy shepherd and an older tougher sheepshearer. The dreamy shepherd was so favored by his old father that his brothers thought of killing him, but the tough-minded sheepshearer had a more profitable idea—selling him as a slave. And, having done that, the sheepshearer, Judah, turned aside and embarked on his own selfcentered career. Many years later, with their old father's fate hanging in the balance, the two sons met in a foreign land and went back in memory to the moment of selling. After a further lapse of many years, the dying old man singled out the two of them for special blessing.

The story begins (chap. 37) with the selling of the young shepherd. The complex figure of Joseph has several levels—pampered, prophetic, providential—but the only thing his brothers see is pampering and pretentiousness and so, despite the pain to their father, they eliminate him, and even make a profit out of it. The prophetic dreamer is stilled.

It is then that Judah, the one who thought of selling him, embarks on a career in which there is no shadow of dream or prophecy (chap. 38). He marries and deals in marriage, moving the pieces as he likes, including his daughterin-law, Tamar. But Tamar rattled his cage, and the experience was sufficiently disturbing to make him reconsider his life.


Aspects of the Larger Joseph Story

The Joseph story is not a special pearl, different from the rest of Genesis. Rather it is of a piece with the book as a whole. It is Genesis breaking into full bloom, a blossoming that builds on all that precedes. In particular, it is “the second half of the Jacob story” (Wenham, II, xxvi). It is also part of the unity whereby Genesis moves gradually from being episodic to being clearly sequential (see Introduction, Chapter 2, “Spiraling Structures”).

The relationship of the Joseph story to history is not essentially different from that of the rest of Genesis. The Joseph narrative shows knowledge of Egyptian life and customs, but “such evidence …could also be found in a work of fiction” (Murphy, 2:60), and, while the essential account is historically possible—world history, including that of Egypt, often tells of foreigners doing

-351-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Genesis as Dialogue: A Literary, Historical, & Theological Commentary
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 579

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.