Handbook of Parenting - Vol. 3

By Marc H. Bornstein | Go to book overview

15
Parents' Knowledge and
Expectations: Using What We Know
Jacqueline J. Goodnow
MacQuarie University

INTRODUCTION

This chapter on parents' knowledge and expectations revolves around two questions. The first asks: what do we know that is useful when we move from research into action: into advising parents or into planning or evaluating programs of parental “education” or “support”? The second takes the form: what gaps in our knowledge now become apparent?

The emphasis on action-oriented issues reflects a shift within developmental studies. There is now, for example, the journal Parenting, with the subtitle “Science and Practice. ” The term developmental science is also appearing as a term covering an aimed-for integration between research and action (e.g., Shonkoff, 2000; Shonkoff and Phillips, 2000). Increasingly, psychologists are being called upon to translate what they know into recommendations for action at a family or a policy level and into terms that make sense to others outside their own field.

For the present chapter, the emphasis on translations into practice involves a broadening in audience and perspective but not a complete breach with the past. The audience in mind now covers not only psychologists but also a variety of people who aim at understanding parents' viewpoints and, where needed, at promoting change: change in the way parents view their children or themselves, change in the way they go about the tasks of parenting or accessing community resources. That audience may now include physicians, nurses, teachers, social workers, and policy makers.

The sources drawn on have also been broadened. As in the chapter on this topic contained in the previous Handbook, these sources cover analyses of knowledge and expectations from anthropologists and sociologists as well as by psychologists. To them has now been added, however, more material from intervention programs aimed at changing parents' ideas and actions.

The shift toward asking about translations into action does not, however, mean a reduced interest in basic research on the way people think, especially research in relation to the nature and bases of change. Analyses of parents' ideas benefit by being linked to models and methods

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Handbook of Parenting - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents of Volume 3: Being and Becoming a Parent vii
  • Preface xi
  • Contents of Volume 1: Children and Parenting xv
  • Contents of Volume 2: Biology and Ecology of Parenting xvii
  • Contents of Volume 4: Social Conditions and Applied Parenting xix
  • Contents of Volume 5: Practical Issues in Parenting xxi
  • About the Authors in Volume 3 xxv
  • Part I - The Parent 1
  • 1 - Mothering 3
  • References *
  • 2 - Fathers and Families 27
  • References *
  • 3 - Coparenting in Diverse Family Systems 75
  • References *
  • 4 - Single Parenthood 109
  • References *
  • 5 - Grandparenthood 141
  • References *
  • 6 - Adolescent Parenthood 173
  • References *
  • 7 - Nonparental Caregiving 215
  • References *
  • 8 - Sibling Caregiving 253
  • References *
  • 9 - Parenting in Divorced and Remarried Families 287
  • References 310
  • 10 - Lesbian and Gay Parenthood 317
  • References *
  • 11 - Parenting and Contemporary Reproductive Technologies 339
  • References *
  • Part II - Becoming and Being a Parent 361
  • 12 - The Transition to Parenting 363
  • References *
  • 13 - Stages of Parental Development 389
  • References *
  • 14 - Personality and Parenting 415
  • References *
  • 15 - Parents' Knowledge and Expectations: Using What We Know 439
  • References *
  • 16 - Parental Monitoring and Knowledge of Children 461
  • References *
  • 17 - Parent Beliefs Are Cognitions: the Dynamic Belief Systems Model 485
  • References *
  • 18 - Parental Attributions 509
  • References *
  • 19 - Parental Attitudes Toward Childrearing 537
  • References 559
  • 20 - Psychoanalysis and Parenthood 563
  • References *
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