Dixiecrats and Democrats: Alabama Politics 1942-1950

By William D. Barnard | Go to book overview

6

THE ENDURING CLASH:
Race, Class, Party, and the
Dixiecrat Revolt

In October of 1947, four of Alabama's leading journalists tried to dissect the nature and prospects of Southern liberalism. Colonel Harry B. Ayers, editor of the Anniston Star and a Democrat of progressive views dating back to Woodrow Wilson, argued that the outlook for liberalism in Alabama was auspicious. Dr. D. L. Hunt, editorial writer for the Birmingham News, agreed. Liberalism, he thought, was increasing in strength both in the larger cities of the state and in the smaller towns, particularly in north Alabama. Oscar Zuber, editorial writer for the News and formerly for the Richmond Times-Dispatch, extended the optimistic projections of Hunt and Ayers to the South as a whole, with the lone exception of Virginia. Only Gould Beech of the Southern Farmer dissented from the sanguine views of his colleagues. 1

Beech's recent encounter with conservative forces in the legislature undoubtedly colored his judgment. He was not alone, however, in the pessimism with which he viewed the prospects for Southern liberalism. The Birmingham News thought Beech had been "impressive in the picture he drew of oppressive forces at work in the South to crush independence of thought and expression." Still, the News felt that "in Alabama, as in the South at large, there are vastly more progressives than is realized by many of us or by critics in other sections of the country." The News was optimistic for the future. "If this [liberal] sentiment could be made cohesive, the pace of emancipation from old and unhappy prejudices would become more rapid and more constructive." 2

The optimism of the News, of Ayers and his colleagues would soon be tested in the election year of 1948. The States' Rights revolt in Alabama that year was the successful culmination of a series of attempts by the conservative faction within the Democratic party to wrest control of the state's political life from the adherents of the New Deal and, in more recent days, from the followers of Folsom. Rebuffed in 1944 in their

-95-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dixiecrats and Democrats: Alabama Politics 1942-1950
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 200

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.