Dixiecrats and Democrats: Alabama Politics 1942-1950

By William D. Barnard | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY

The richest sources for this manuscript have been the collections of papers which have been deposited in recent years in the Alabama Department of Archives and History (hereinafter, ADAH) in Montgomery, Alabama. Especially valuable were the papers of Frank M. Dixon, governor of Alabama (1939-1943) and a leader of the Dixiecrats. Dixon's papers are as fine a representation of the mind and thought of a conservative political leader in the Deep South of the 1940's as are likely to become available. Useful also were the papers of Chauncey Sparks, governor of the state from 1943 to 1947. Sparks' Scrapbooks are a valuable part of this collection. They provide convenient access to a large collection of the newspaper columns of two talented journalists and political commentators, Grover Hall, Jr., whose "Hallmarks" appeared in the Alabama Journal and the Montgomery Advertiser, and John Temple Graves, whose column, "This Morning," appeared in the Birmingham Post.

Of lesser value are both the official Folsom Executive Papers and the personal papers of Governor Folsom in the ADAH. The papers of Walter L. Randolph, a long-time leader in the Alabama and American Farm Bureau, of Marion Rushton, a conservative Democratic leader who was the state's Democratic National Committeeman throughout much of the 1940's, and of Grover Hall, Jr. (a very small collection), also contained items of interest.

The papers of Ralph Hammond, press secretary and later, in the second administration, executive secretary to Governor Folsom, were useful for the insight they provided into Folsom as a man and as governor, but they were of limited value for this study since they concern Folsom's second administration (1955-1959) almost exclusively. These papers remain in the possession of Mr. Hammond, who was kind enough to permit me to use them.

Also of limited value for this study but fascinating for the glimpse they provide of a nationally known racial liberal who returned to Alabama after World War II and lived there until the late 1950's are the papers of Aubrey W. Williams in the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library in Hyde Park, N. Y. The files of the Democratic Party's National Committee (1928-1948), also in the Roosevelt Library, contain a few items of interest.

Although this work is not based to any great extent upon oral history, a number of interviews proved most helpful. James E. Folsom was kind enough to spend a considerable number of days in the summer of 1968 talking with me in Cullman, Alabama. So too did Ralph and Myra Hammond of Arab,

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