Flesh Wounds: The Culture of Cosmetic Surgery

By Virginia L. Blum | Go to book overview

TWO
Untouchable Bodies

“I had huge zits I had a huge cold sore on my lip stretch marks all over my butt… birthmarks, bruises. You name it. It's airbrushed.

MTV show host (and Playboy playmate) Jenny McCarthy, revealing the secrets of her best-selling poster, Glamour magazine

A young woman took a summer job as a receptionist in a local plastic surgeon's office. Always troubled by the fullness of her lower face, she read about a procedure for removing the pockets of fat (buccal fat pads) from either side of the mouth. Eager for this slimming effect from what was described in the literature as an extremely simple operation, she asked her summer employer to perform the surgery.

She woke up from surgery without cheeks. In place of what were once sumptuous curves now extended a flat plain that had been liposuctioned clean. Meanwhile, the fat on the sides of her mouth remained untouched. The surgeon somehow had misunderstood her request, determined what he believed needed “correction, and ruined this young woman's appearance. In contrast to the narrowed upper face, the lower face seemed even broader than before.

-35-

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