D. H. Lawrence: Fifty Years on Film

By Louis K. Greiff | Go to book overview

2
The Rocking Horse Winner:
Expansions and Interpolations

The Rocking Horse Winner, released in 1949, represents the moviegoer's introduction to Lawrence. Director Anthony Pelissier wrote the screenplay and therefore did most of the work of transforming Lawrence's words into visual drama. John Mills also did double duty as producer and as the actor portraying Bassett, a character far more prominent on screen than in the original story. The major actors (including Mills himself) all had had recent experience in films adapted from literature. Valerie Hobson who portrayed Hester Grahame, Paul's mother had worked with Mills just a few years earlier in David Lean's adaptation of Great Expectations (1946). The child actor who played Paul, John Howard Davies, had the title role in Lean's 1948 adaptation of Oliver Twist. 1

Some fifty years after its release, The Rocking Horse Winner remains available on videotape, even though several more recent Lawrence films have been withdrawn from circulation. 2 Beyond this, Pelissier's Rocking Horse is unique among all the Lawrence feature films in that its shooting script has been published. The script remains accessible thanks to the Dickenson Literature and Film Series of casebooks, which includes a volume on the process of bringing Lawrence's story to the screen. A bit of irony about the 1949 Rocking Horse production involves the mark of the censors upon it censors much like those who chased Lawrence himself across an entire lifetime. They required that the following biblical passage (Luke 17:1–2) appear superimposed across the film's final shot:

It is impossible but that offences will come: but woe unto him, through whom they come! It were better for him that a millstone were

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
D. H. Lawrence: Fifty Years on Film
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 275

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.