D. H. Lawrence: Fifty Years on Film

By Louis K. Greiff | Go to book overview

Filmography

The Rocking Horse Winner. Directed by Anthony Pelissier. 91 min. Two Cities Films Ltd., 1949. Producer: John Mills. Screenplay: Anthony Pelissier. Photography: Desmond Dickinson. Art Director: Carmen Dillon. Film Editor: John Seabourne. Music: William Alwyn. With Valerie Hobson (Hester), John Howard Davies (Paul), John Mills (Bassett), Ronald Squire (Uncle Oscar), and Hugh Sinclair (Paul's Father).

L'Amant de Lady Chatterley. Directed by Marc Allegret. 98 min. Regie du Film and Orsay Films, 1955. Producer: Gilbert Cohn-Seat. Screenplay: Marc Allegret (from the play by Gaston Bonheur and Philippe de Rothschild). Photography: Georges Perinal. Settings: Alexandre Trauner. Music: Joseph Kosma. English Subtitles: Mai Harris. With Danielle Darrieux (Connie), Leo Genn (Sir Clifford), Erno Crisa (Mellors), Berthe Tissen (Mrs. Bolton), Janine Crispin (Hilda), and Jacqueline Noelle (Bertha).

Sons and Lovers. Directed by Jack Cardiff. 100 min. Twentieth Century Fox, 1960. Producer: Jerry Wald. Screenplay: Gavin Lambert and T. E. B. Clarke. Photography: Freddie Francis. Art Director: Lionel Couch. Film Editor: Gordon Pilkington. Music: Mario Nascimbene. With Dean Stockwell (Paul), Wendy Hiller (Gertrude), Trevor Howard (Walter Morel), Heather Sears (Miriam), Mary Ure (Clara), Rosalie Crutchley (Mrs. Leivers), and Donald Pleasence (Pappleworth).

The Fox. Directed by Mark Rydell. 110 min. Claridge Pictures and Warner Brothers, 1968. Producer: Raymond Stross. Screenplay: Lewis John Carlino and Howard Koch. Photography: William Braker. Art Director: Charles Bailey. Film Editor: Thomas Stanford. Music: Lalo Schifrin. With Sandy Dennis (Banford), Keir Dullea (Paul), and Anne Heywood (March).

Women in Love. Directed by Ken Russell. 132 min. Brandywine Productions Ltd. and United Artists, 1969. Producers: Larry Kramer and Martin Rosen. Screenplay: Larry Kramer. Photography: Billy Williams. Art Director: Ken Jones. Sets: Luciana Arrighi. Costumes: Shirley Russell. Film Editor: Michael Bradsell. Music: Georges Delerue. With Alan Bates (Birkin), Oliver Reed (Gerald), Glenda Jackson (Gudrun), Jennie Linden (Ursula), Eleanor Bron (Hermione), Vladek Sheybal (Loerke), Alan Webb (Mr. Crich), Catherine Wilmer (Mrs. Crich), and Christopher Gable (Tibby).

The Virgin and the Gypsy. Directed by Christopher Miles. 92 min. Chevron Pictures, 1970. Producer: Kenneth Harper. Screenplay: Alan Plater. Photography: Bob Huke. Art Director: David Brockhurst. Film Editor: Paul Davies. Music: Patrick Gowers. With Joanna Shimkus (Yvette), Franco Nero (the gypsy), Honor Blackman (Mrs. Fawcett), Mark Burns (Major Eastwood), Maurice Denham (The Rector), Fay Compton (Granny), Kay Walsh (Aunt Cissie), and Norman Bird (Uncle Fred).

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