The Catholic Revolution: New Wine, Old Wineskins, and the Second Vatican Council

By Andrew Greeley | Go to book overview

SEVEN
New Rules, New Prophets,
and Beige Catholicism

Revolutionary events and the collapse of institutional structures (paradigms and their motivations) always leave chaos, confusion, and conflict in their wake. 1 The conflicts over the French Revolution, energized by the storming of the Bastille as its eventful symbol, continued in France until the return of Charles de Gaulle from Colombey in 1958. A fervent Catholic and a fervent Republican, le général provided the occasion for healing the breach between the Church and the Republic, an occasion many on both sides had sought for years. The shape of the Fifth Republic seems to have institutionalized that new tolerance. Will the confusion within Catholicism continue for another two centuries?

Probably not. Those who dissent from the Council and from the subsequent collapse of the rules have been revitalized by the pontificate of John Paul II, but they are only a small minority (e.g., only about 12 percent of the U. S. population agrees with the Church's stance on birth control), and there is no reason to think their numbers will increase. Nonetheless, in the three decades

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The Catholic Revolution: New Wine, Old Wineskins, and the Second Vatican Council
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents ix
  • Tables xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Old Wineskins 5
  • One - A Catholic Revolution 7
  • Two - The “confident” Church 17
  • Three - The Wineskins Burst 34
  • Four - What Happened? 41
  • Five - Effervescence Spreads from the Council to the World 61
  • Six - How Do They Stay? 71
  • Seven - New Rules, New Prophets, and Beige Catholicism 81
  • Eight - Only in America? 90
  • Nine - Why They Stay 99
  • Ten - Priests 120
  • Part II - The Search for New Wineskins 129
  • Eleven - Recovering the Catholic Heritage 131
  • Twelve - Religious Education and Beauty 150
  • Thirteen - Authority as Charm 168
  • Fourteen - Liturgists and the Laity 179
  • Conclusion 191
  • Notes 197
  • References 207
  • Index 211
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