The Catholic Revolution: New Wine, Old Wineskins, and the Second Vatican Council

By Andrew Greeley | Go to book overview

THIRTEEN
Authority as Charm

A young village girl told me that, when I am about to talk to anyone, I picture Jesus Christ and how gracious and friendly he was to everyone.

John Vianney

The fear of beauty is rooted under the roots of fear.

Marie Ponsot

In this chapter I propose that the problem of authority is experienced in the Church not so much with the authority exercised by the Vatican or by the Chancery Offices but by the local parish. 1 For weal or woe, the laity figure that the former two levels are far away, have no direct influence on their lives, and can safely be ignored. However, it is in the local parish where the Church exercises its only remaining power to control the lives of the people— the denial of access to the Sacraments. Reception of baptism, confirmation, First Communion, and matrimony has often been turned into an obstacle course the laity must survive, rather than

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The Catholic Revolution: New Wine, Old Wineskins, and the Second Vatican Council
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents ix
  • Tables xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Old Wineskins 5
  • One - A Catholic Revolution 7
  • Two - The “confident” Church 17
  • Three - The Wineskins Burst 34
  • Four - What Happened? 41
  • Five - Effervescence Spreads from the Council to the World 61
  • Six - How Do They Stay? 71
  • Seven - New Rules, New Prophets, and Beige Catholicism 81
  • Eight - Only in America? 90
  • Nine - Why They Stay 99
  • Ten - Priests 120
  • Part II - The Search for New Wineskins 129
  • Eleven - Recovering the Catholic Heritage 131
  • Twelve - Religious Education and Beauty 150
  • Thirteen - Authority as Charm 168
  • Fourteen - Liturgists and the Laity 179
  • Conclusion 191
  • Notes 197
  • References 207
  • Index 211
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