The Catholic Revolution: New Wine, Old Wineskins, and the Second Vatican Council

By Andrew Greeley | Go to book overview
Save to active project

FOURTEEN
Liturgists and the Laity

In the coupling of these sacred callings and network effects, liturgists such as Bob have difficulty taking the role of others involved in parish work. Liturgists find their intolerance a virtue, their unveiling of others' liturgical ignorance as educational, their politics as righteous, their disdain as caring, and their failures as successes. These are the ironic experiences that rest inside the situation of the oppositional insider, and they are the experiences that fuel the terrorism inflicted by liturgists in the name of holier worship practices. What is clear about Bob's trajectory is that the existing moral orders of parish life that confront him as he enters each parish are of little importance to him other than as a set of arrangements that must be radically changed.

Michael J. McCallion and David R. Maines

I always tell the staff here that, if people do not come to church, we have to ask ourselves first “Why?” instead of first blaming people for not looking at the world as church ministers do. I tell them that if we have nothing compelling enough to cause people to attend, then we have failed Jesus—the people have not failed.

Monsignor Ignotus

-179-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Catholic Revolution: New Wine, Old Wineskins, and the Second Vatican Council
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 224

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?