What I Learned in Medical School: Personal Stories of Young Doctors

By Kevin M. Takakuwa; Nick Rubashkin et al. | Go to book overview

WHAT I LEARNED IN MEDICAL SCHOOL
PERSONAL STORIES OF YOUNG DOCTORS

EDITED BY
KEVIN M. TAKAKUWA + NICK RUBASHKIN + KAREN E. HERZIG
WITH A FOREWORD BY JOYCELYN ELDERS

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA PRESS BERKELEY • LOS ANGELES • LONDON

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What I Learned in Medical School: Personal Stories of Young Doctors
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Praise for What I Learned in Medical School *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword xi
  • Introduction xv
  • Part One - Life and Family Histories 1
  • Becoming an American 9
  • Melanie's Story 19
  • Pavement 23
  • Whispers from the Third Generation 31
  • Borderlands 37
  • Poison in My Coffee 47
  • Part Two - Shifting Identities 55
  • Necessary Accessories 63
  • Medical School Metamorphosis 70
  • Why Am I in Medical School? 75
  • My Secret Life 80
  • Five Points off for Going to Medical School 87
  • Parasympathizing 92
  • Sometimes, All You Can Do is Laugh 114
  • A Prayer from a Closeted Christian 121
  • Seeing with New Eyes How Ayurveda Transformed My Life 126
  • Part Three - Confronted 135
  • Hoka Hey 143
  • My Names 145
  • A Case Presentation 154
  • Urology Blues 161
  • Like Everyone Else 168
  • Daring to Be a Doctor 177
  • A Graduation Speech 182
  • Afterword 189
  • Further Reading 195
  • Contributors 199
  • Acknowledgments 205
  • Photo Credits 209
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